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Thread: Sunderland P9622 crash location on 29 October 1940

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    Default Sunderland P9622 crash location on 29 October 1940

    Hello,

    I would like to find the crash location of the Sunderland I P9622 of 201 Sqn RAF on 29 October 1940.

    The detailed narrative of the mission leading to the crash is available online on the following link:
    http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchi...0-%201039.html
    (and next page)

    But the loss location is not given, and in Ross's CCL book, the location is only given as "a hill 28 miles SW of Wick", and before it is said "when lost at Dunnet Head,Caithness", but this location is NW, and not SW, of Wick.

    For a crash in UK, the precise location is usually known, so I hope someone will be able to provide it.

    Thanks in advance

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    Laurent, Hi,

    28 miles SW of Wick gives problems. Statute Miles or Nautical Miles, and SW of Wick Town, or Wick Airfield? It matters not because there was high ground thereabouts. Dunnet Head was a WW2 Radar Station and, presumably, the a/c was 'lost' when it went off their radar screens - even though it may have been on one of their 'back beams'. Now I have not done the "line of sight" and the "curvature of the earth" from Dunnet Head Radar Station to the possible impact site. Ian The Radar can tell us that? But I think that the two statements are compatible!
    HTH
    Peter Davies

    PS You can get a "Height Profile" off Google Earth, and it looks as if it might just be possible! However, I do not know if that Height Profile includes Earth Curvature? Or does GE assume the Earth is flat? (which we all know to be true, and supported on the backs of 4 large elephants who, in turn, stand on the back of a large turtle who swims in a vast sea!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!). LOL
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 19th February 2014 at 15:40. Reason: Line-of-sight info
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Scotland's People lists the four casualties as being killed 'near Latheron'.

    The Statutory Death notice lists AC1 George Kenneth NANGLE, 973249 (not George Allan Nangle as per the CWGC website).

    Regards

    Simon

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    Thanks Simon, your replay allowed me to find something. A new Google search on Latheron + 'october 1940' allowed me to find a blog "Caithness at war", where the crash is reported at http://community.caithness.org/article.php?id=4204.

    "On 30 October Latheron police reported that a plane had crashed in Plane crash Latheron the parish. An airman arrived at Boulester, Latheron, at 09.30 hours this morning and reported that his plane was down 5 miles due West of Boulester, in hill ground. The airman said he thought the other four occupants of the plane were dead. He himself was suffering from a broken shoulder. The plane struck a hill."

    Some difference, but 5 miles west of Lautheron (I have not been able to find a Boulester location) will be more than 20 miles SW of Wick. If Boulester was the name of an hamlet located W or SW of Lautheron, the distance is OK. The number of the dead is OK too, but the diary did not record the survivors. The hill crash is also in common, and the Flight Global article said that the pilot walked four miles the next morning. So I'm fairly positive this aircraft was P9622.

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