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Thread: Bomber Crash Seaton Sluice, Blyth

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    Default Bomber Crash Seaton Sluice, Blyth

    I am seeking help,

    I have just been to a talk regarding aviation crash sites and was approached by a chap who can recall as a boy an unidentified bomber/aircraft crash landing in Holywell Dean, Seaton Sluice, Blyth during the 1940s.
    He tells me that the aircraft appeared to have landed whole and was removed on queen Mary trailers. He was at the site as a boy but could not identify the aircraft

    Can anyone provide any possible details.

    Regards

    Chris

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    Hello Chris

    Hampden L4054 of 83S abandoned out of fuel 6/4/40 came to rest 400 yds inland from St Mary's Lighthouse. Four crewmen killed.

    regards

    DaveW

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    From my trilogy For Your Tomorrow - A record of New Zealanders who have died while serving with the RNZAF and Allied Air Services since 1915 (Volume One: Fates 1915-1942):

    Sat 6/Sun 7 Apr 1940
    Bomber Command
    Security patrol of German seaplane bases
    83 Squadron, RAF (Scampton, Lincolnshire - 5 Group)
    Hampden I L4054 - took off at 1915 and ran out of fuel returning after nine hours in the air. Abandoned at 0415 over Whitley Bay, Northumberland, L4054 crashed into the sea near St Mary’s lighthouse. The bodies of three crew members were later recovered from the sea, while the wireless operator is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial. Both pilots are buried at East Chevington, Northumberland.
    Pilot: 40319 Plt Off Wilfred ROBERTS, RAF - Age 25. 357hrs.
    (Pilot): 41251 Plt Off Keith BROOKE-TAYLOR, RAF - Age 21. 266hrs. 5th op.
    Roberts was born at Brisbane, Australia, but educated in New Zealand. Selected for a short service commission in the RAF, he embarked for England in 1937. His number of operational flights is unknown but the first was undertaken on the first day of the war.
    Brooke-Taylor was probably acting as observer on this flight. His brother, Rex Brooke-Taylor, died on 30 December 1940 while flying with 3 Service Flying Training School, RNZAF.


    And an amendment from Vol Three (Biographies & Appendices):

    ROBERTS & BROOKE-TAYLOR – actually crashed on land, ¼ mile west of St Mary’s Lighthouse, exploding bombs scattering the wreckage over a wide area. The crew had baled out over the sea after repeatedly signalling ‘SOS’ by Aldis lamp while circling the lighthouse, the bodies of three being recovered at 0800.

    Errol

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    Gents,

    Thank you for replying, however, this is not the aircraft,
    Seaton Sluice/Holywell Dean is mile further north and 1mile further in land.

    regards

    Chris
    Last edited by Chris Davies; 27th February 2014 at 20:27. Reason: typo

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    The aircraft may not have been a bomber 'per se',

    It may well have been a Beaufighter, The aircraft he saw as a child did have more than one engine.
    Sorry the tale is sketchy but it is all I have to work on.

    Regards

    Chris

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    Just bringing this one back to the front as a last ditched attempt.

    regards

    Chris

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    Chris

    I attach a War Revision OS 1" to 1 mile. There was a CG (Coastguard) Station at Seaton Sluice on the coast. There were Lifeboat and CG Stations at Blyth and Lifeboat and Wireless Station at Cullercoats.

    Mark


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    Mark,

    In the area 8196
    Aircraft was whole, so presume a forced landing

    Chris

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    Chris

    Searching "Lookout Farm", might be worth contacting Brian Pears too:-
    See http://www.ne-diary.bpears.org.uk/PindexA.html

    A quick look:-
    Wednesday, 28th/Thursday, 29th August 1940 N361
    Northumberland. Whitley Bay raided, an enemy aircraft downed at Hartley.

    One Fighter Group Appx in TNA, for Northern England was detailed with raid reports & a/c down etc.

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 9th March 2014 at 19:53.

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    Hi Mark,

    Having checked with various archives, I can find no trace of an 'enemy' aircraft comming down at Hartley or off the coast for 28-29/08/1940.

    Any further advice on your source?

    Regards

    Chris

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