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Thread: Bomber Command flight destinations

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    Default Bomber Command flight destinations

    Looking through my father's log book for his time flying for HQ Bomber Command (from November 1944) I found most of his destinations were alpha/numeric codes such as:

    A62D
    B102
    A46
    A68
    775

    ...and so on. The rest of his log book when he was flying with 192 Squadron or training has mostly named destinations. Does anyone have any idea how I might be able to find out more about these codes and their locations please?

    Thanks

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    Such Axx and Bxx codes were given to American and British airfields on the Continent after D-Day, I'm afraid I don't have a list of these to hand. I don't think this would identify 775 and maybe not A62D, so it may be a red herring.

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    If he was on operational flights, then these look like Target numbers. The easiest way to find target places would be to look at his Squadron ORBs in the AIR 27 Series on microfilm.

    If you are a hardened researcher with a TNA (National Archives) 'Readers Ticket' (Pass) for Kew and willing to hunt for the files which contain WW2 Target letter/numbers, you can usually find them in the Bomber Command 'Intelligence', or 'Planning' or 'Plans', or 'Directives' files from 1944 in either AIR 2, or AIR 22, or AIR 14, or AIR 20 and possibly there might be some in AIR 40 or other AIR series if flying from overseas bases?

    1940 example - found numbers in:- "AIR 20/2060" Directives to Bomber Command D of Ops Home
    Contained details of when bombing ops were [first] approved, targets, with target numbers, names and oil stored etc.

    http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/sho...ber-Refs/page2
    mentions "Air 14/3726 has a seemingly random 10-page target list, almost certainly from early 1944. It's a mixed bunch of targets though, no obvious reason for them being grouped together and there's absolutely no explanation with it.

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 17th April 2014 at 16:10.

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    Northfields192,
    You state he was with HQ Bomber Command, so I would guess that you do not know which squadron he was flying with on these operations. However if you give the aircraft type and serial number (if stated in logbook), or better still the unit code letters if they appear, and captains name, somebody on this board may be able to assist. It seems likekly that he volunteered to be aboard these aircraft for some particular reason, possibly to study some special aspect of the bombing campaign (German defence measures, for instance) when it was thought that the risk of such a trip could be justified for this man, who may have had some special area of interest that could only be sastified by actually seeing for himself.
    David D

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    Northfields,

    You do not state if your father was a pilot or filled some other role, but if it was the former and he was flying for HQ Bomber Command, rather than just Bomber Comand, he might have been piloting light aircraft from Lacey Green, a small landing ground about a mile north of HQ Bomber Command. It was used from June 1944 until about 1946. Basically the aircraft were on the strength of a Communcation Squadron, not sure which but Halton seems to come to mind.

    If I'm correct the numbers you quote might have been landing ground in France. AM Harris was the first to take advantage of the strip on 6 June 1944.

    Brian

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    Thank you all and I'm new to this so my apologies for not giving some of the information I should. My father was the pilot and he flew for HQ Bomber Command itself. His log book has HQBC Comm: Flt: Halton and his first flight (of 10 minutes) was to Lacey Green. He flew Auster, Anson, Proctor, Oxford, Hornet, M38 aircraft but mostly be flew in an Anson. He seemed to have all sorts of passengers from army and air force staff, including generals and air commodores, to someone who is in his log as R.Dimbleby and who may well have been Richard Dimbleby the war reporter.

    I think the destinations must be sites in France as the flying time is often around 2hrs.

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    That fits perfectly Northfields; those are the aircraft I would have expected to have been recorded.

    Should you be interested I have an aerial photo of the landing ground taken about the time the site was abandoned. The 'accommodation' was a small blister hanger, otherwise the only other indication the field was used by aircraft was a windsock. A local remembered the following types using the site:

    Taylorcraft Auster
    Miles M28
    Miles Messenger
    Percival Proctor
    Tiger Moth
    De Haviland 86B Hornet Moth

    Go to http://petergoodearl.co.uk/laceygreen/index.htm and see The 1940s Lacey Green Airfield by Douglas Tilbury (towards the bottom of the right column).

    Brian

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    N192

    http://www.pprune.org/aviation-histo...-normandy.html seems to have a pretty comprehensive list.

    I'd be pretty sure you are correct in identifying R Dimbleby as the Richard Dimbleby.

    Brian
    Last edited by Lyffe; 20th April 2014 at 10:57.

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    There should also be a Command HQ ORB, so it is worth checking the Red AIR 24 paper indexes too outside the Reading Room.

    The Press Policy file in AIR 14/1451 only goes to February 1944 (although it may give a useful insight into what was going on earlier in 1944).

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 21st April 2014 at 11:15.

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    I think it is unlikely that any of the HQ Bomber Command files include any reference to Lacey Green. I'm pretty sure these relate to the serious matters of Bomber Command operations. I looked at the RAF High Wycombe files some time ago whilst researching another matter, and found they were mostly about domestic issues.

    There is no record of a HQ Bomber Command Communications Flight in the RAFweb summary of units at RAF Halton (http://www.rafweb.org/Stations/Stations-H.htm#Halton). There is, however, a Bomber Command Communications Flight (BCCF) listed as being based at Halton from May 1942 to October 1946. I'm pretty sure that whatever is actually written in the log book relates to duties with this unit rather than any other, and any reference to a HQBC Communication Flight refers either to a small Flight within the BCCF, or a flight made on behalf of passengers for HQ Bomber Command.

    The National Archives holds a number of files for RAF Communication Flights, but these mostly refer to overseas units - there is nothing for either the BCCF or, if it ever existed, a HQBCCF.

    Brian

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