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Thread: Release from air force service

  1. #1
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    Default Release from air force service

    Does anyone have a complete list of items given to personnel when they were released from air force service at the dispersal centre.

    So far, I have:

    Civilian clothing, including suit, shirt, collar and tie
    Release papers, including Service and Release Book and Clothing Book
    N.A.A.F.I. rations, including cigarettes and sweets

    I have seen reference to a "demob box" (which I think was the clothing?) and I am wondering if they also received a Ration Book.

    I want to be as precise as possible, so any help would be much appreciated.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  2. #2
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    Hi Pete
    I'm not sure where you could look to check, but if you need precision then consider that Civilian clothing is likely to have included underclothes, an overcoat or raincoat, a hat and shoes perhaps and/or boots and a container, say a suitcase. Like anyone else in wartime they would already have a Ration Book but, spending most of their time being fed by the Service, they would not have had possession of it personally but would have needed it to go on leave. Upon Demob it may well have been a case not of issuing a Ration Book ,but of returning it from Service "custody". It seems feasible that it could have been a new ,updated, and full replacement. I don't think that an individual's Ration Book could have been retained and used by wife or family whilst the person was away on active duty.
    Not a lot but I hope it is a start.
    REgards
    Dick

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    Hello Pete
    The King's Regulations and Air Council Instructions for the Royal Air Force, has a whole Chapter XXXII Clothing and odd paragraphs in other Chapters throughout the Volume.

    1942 Edition of K.R. & A.C.I. para. 2554, Clause 1. Plain Clothes and Plain Clothes Allowance, indicates it was normally the duty of an Airman to make his own arrangements for the provision of plain clothes "on discharge or transfer to the reserve" (but the Regs contains various cross references to other paras with exemptions, that I find it impossible to follow) ... Perhaps demob was different? However 'Demob' was not listed in the Clothing index of the Edition.

    Perhaps a post-war K.R. & A.C.I. Edition will give you the information?

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 20th June 2014 at 21:47.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the feedback to date; I have updated the list based on further research and now have:

    At the dispersal centre, personnel were given their Service and Release book which had a number of tear off sections that were utilised during the release process.

    They had a final medical and were interviewed by the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Labour before collecting their civilian clothing which consisted of 1 suit, 1 tie, 1 raincoat, 1 hat, 1 shirt, 2 collars (with studs), 1 pair of shoes and 2 pairs of socks.

    Having settled any outstanding charges for loss or damage to equipment they handed in their paybook and collected their outstanding pay. In addition, they obtained their travel warrant (to enable them to travel home for free) and food coupons to last until The Ministry of Food could send out a Ration Book.

    Having visited the N.A.A.F.I. for rations, such as cigarettes and sweets, they were free to return home, either in their uniform (which they retained) or in their new "civvies".

    I will keep rooting around to see if I can find any further detail and update the thread as I go.

    Regards

    Pete
    Last edited by PeteT; 22nd June 2014 at 09:54.
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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