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Thread: radio or wireless sets in assault gliders ?

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    Default radio or wireless sets in assault gliders ?

    Hello

    This afternoon, I was shown a part recovered from a glider which was force-landed in France, during "Varsity" (the Rhine crossing). We have confirmed of the date through a gendarmerie report. What puzzles me is that this part comes from a radio set, with a tube and other electrical components.

    I'm just wondering whether this could come from the glider itself (not identified yet) or from the cargo she was carrying.

    I thought the glider only had an intercom line linked to their tug.

    TIA

    Joss

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    Joss.

    To the best of my knowledge and according to my research on an AFM medal group awarded to a glider towing incident, all filghts undertaken were with communication by the cable wound into the tow rope. Direct line of sight between the two flying units was a built in safety factor, I feel that your find may well relate to a piece of equipment carried by the troops or stores carried within.

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    Hello Colin

    I'll take pictures of the artefact on Monday, as we have it on loan for the display we're putting up at Alquines. We're unveiling a plaque for S/L P.L.I. ARCHER D.F.C. who lost his life in that village on 17th June 1943, but it's also the place where Welington IV DF550 also ended her flying career. I'll show your book in the display we have prepared in the Parish hall.

    It is also my understanding that there was only an intercom line between glider and tug. But some electrical components (condensers I think) have clearly the A M markings on them. I hope the owner of the artefact will be able to tell us more, from memory. We still don't know whether the glider was a Horsa (probably) or a Hamilcar (a very remote possibility).

    Regards

    Joss

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    Joss.

    You do some fantastic work in your area, another plaque for one of the many brave men who gave all. I am delighted to see that my book will assist in some way to your display, thank you for your comment and the very best wishes for all your hard work and effort. Colin

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    You could try contacting The Assault Glider Trust, based at RAF Shawbury in Shropshire. They have a huge amount of experience and data on the glider subject - including a fullsize rebuilt Horsa, a C-47 tow aircraft and an American assault glider the Waco: the aircraft are now dispersed to go on show at other airfields and museums.
    See http://www.assaultglidertrust.co.uk/content/News.html
    Cheers,
    Tam

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    Hello

    Thanks Colin for your appreciation. May be there will be one or two people interested in acquiring a copy. I'll tell you if someone is interested and will put you in touch.

    Tam, thanks for your suggestion. I had actually been on the website via a google search, but didn't find an answer by just browsing. I'll contact them after I've taken pictures of the radio bit on Monday.

    Regards

    Joss

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    The Pilot's Notes for the Horsa I glider (AP 2097A - PN) contain information on the standard equipment carried in these aircraft, in paragraphs 27, 28:

    27. Radio. There is a TR.9D set installed with a remote control unit (4) for the pilots mounted on the left of straboard pilot's seat. The head-set jacksocket for the port pilot is secured to the seat frame outboard of the seat. (the number 4 in brackets refers to the key number used in the photographic diagrams of the pilots' instruments, controls and equipment.)

    28. Intercommunication. The TR.9D set provides intercommunication between the glider and tug pilots.

    As could be expected, the Horsa's instruments, controls, and other vital equipment were fairly simple and basic, but did include a standard blind flying instrument panel, clear-vision panels in the windscreens and landing flares, etc., and full duplicated flying controls so that either pilot could take over from the other at a moment's notice.

    David D

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    Hello David

    Thanks for your quote from the pilot's notes. It opens a new direction of research, as the TR9D is a quite well known radio set. I've been able to take several pictures of the artefact, which has no marking or plaque on it. Only on electrical components.

    Thanks again to all who contributed

    Joss

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