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Thread: Identity F/O E. J. Whitfield 257 & 263 Squadron, crashed 8th April 1945

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    Default Identity F/O E. J. Whitfield 257 & 263 Squadron, crashed 8th April 1945

    Dear all,

    I'm struggling with the identity (first names and service number) of F/O E. J. Whitfield who joined 257 Squadron in May 1944 and was later transferred to 263 Squadron in March 1945 when 257 Squadron was disbanded. Subsequently he had to bail out his Typhoon at 8th April 1945 near Raalte, Holland and survived the ordeal.

    His service number from an illegible ORB page of 257 Sqdn seems to be xxx428. The ORB of 263 Sqdn doesn't mention his service number. I've also consulted the London Gazette with all available tools, but his name doesn't come up.

    Hopefully some one has his first names and service number on file?

    Thanks in advance,
    Hans

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    Hans, Hi,
    Edwin John Whitfield Commissioned 10 Feb 43 (144022) - from the LG! (Possibly?!)
    The trick is, Hans, to know just how, and when, to swear at the LG when it does not do as it is told!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 29th July 2014 at 13:58. Reason: Uncertainty creeping in!
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hi Peter,

    Thank you very much for your swift response. It must be him, as the service number fits in the illegible and barely recognizable parts of the ORB!

    I'm curious how you did find this info so fast: I've exhausted all possibilties which led to previous successes to extract info from the LG by means of LG website, google search, find tools and tricks provided on this forum, etc, etc.

    Perhaps I should try swearing and threatening too next time?

    Thanks again and kind regards,
    Hans

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    When you know an RAF Officer Surname, rank and a date then I find that the most accurate and quickest way to look at all the possible initials is to use the index at the rear of the Air Force Lists

    Eg the March 1944 AFL

    http://digital.nls.uk/british-milita...fm?id=96376054

    From this you can get a better targeted try for the LG.

    (unless you are a Met man where the chicken entrails and cursing the LG is a more comfortable method)

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
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    Hi Ross,

    Thanks for pointing out the route via the Air Force Lists. I use this method frequently for the 1940 period as the service numbers are mentioned too in that time frame.

    Regards,
    Hans

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    Ross,
    We’ve all been ‘Self Loading Freight’ on RAF a/c at one time or another. The In-flight Ration Boxes always seemed to contain at least 1 x Roast Chicken Leg. 1 x 60 pax on your bog-standard ASI Airbridge (and done more of them than you’ve had ‘ot dinners!) indicates that there were a lot of chicken legs. Did they breed 4-legged chickens especially for RAF a/c? Where, one might ask, did the breasts go? To the Catering Flight, the Sgts Mess, and then the Officer’s Mess (in that order of precedence)?
    But where, pray, did the entrails of all these chickens go? They all went to the Met Section. Hairy old outstation Met forecasters have used the same to save countless lives when the Dunstable/Command/Group forecast said otherwise. Admittedly, the entrails were, on some occasions, in the wrong direction. But you can’t win ‘em all!!
    And I still think that cussin’ the LG works wonders. And, as a stage beyond, clenching one’s fist, and bringing it smartly down on the offending computer works wonders. (technically, it’s called ‘Impact Maintenance’).
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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