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Thread: Ww2 Flying Instructors

  1. #1
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    Default Ww2 Flying Instructors

    Evening,

    I have some documents to a pilot who was posted to an operational spitfire squadron and participated in a number of scrambles and convoy duties or a 2 month period. He was then sent on a B.A.T (Beam Approach Training?) course for a week but instead of rejoining the fighter squadron, he was posted to Canada and became an instructor.

    How did a pilot become an instructor? Did they volunteer for it, or were they selected? It just seems strange to me that a trained pilot who became operational in 1941 would be posted to become an instructor?

    Thank
    TEC

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    Hi,

    There could be many reasons but normally where an aircrew member showed a particular aptitude to something, they would be asked if that was something that they would consider.

    From SFTS's, where pilots developed their flying, it was not unusual for 2 or 3 of a course of near 40 to be sent off for further training before joining an SFTS as an instructor. Equally, following a tour of duty, he could be rested and sent off to train others.

    What stage of the war are we talking about?

    Regards,

    Nick
    KenFentonsWar.com

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    What surprises me is that a Spitfire pilot would be sent on Beam Approach Training course. His instructional fate seems to have been determined at that point. While one may not fathom the precise reason this man was sent to Canada, the nature of the school to which he went, and his duties there, might suggest a plausible reason.

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    Perhaps the man was found not suitable for combat service for some reason. I do not mean LMF but rather some deficiencies, like poor flying in formation, etc.
    Hugh, BAT training was not uncommon amongst fighter pilots, especially those flying in bad weather like in Orkneys. It seems, however, that only one pilot of a squadron was send on a course, only to pass his knowledge to colleagues.

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    Good evening,

    Thank you for your replies.

    This happened in March 1942, the pilot in question was sent to Canada where he was trained as an instructor and spent the remainder of the war training others.

    Interestingly, he returned to the same SFTS as he was initially trained at!

    TEC

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