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Thread: LAC pilot u/t 1067083

  1. #1
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    Default LAC pilot u/t 1067083

    Just came across this poor chaps grave In Goole cemetery today. Got a pic of it if anyone needs it.
    WWParkinson
    Last edited by Diane Gollop; 13th October 2014 at 19:15.

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    so no one knows a thing about it, how many poor recruits were lost in training . They say the undercarriage of a wellington was good for 65 landings and therefore many crews were lost when this lot collapsed. Is this a new thread ?

    men lost in training for a lack of understanding of the new airplanes (kites} of the day?

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    Diane,
    I presume your man is the W W Parkinson mentioned in your post. However you would not usually find an LAC A/P u/t being put in charge of a large aircraft such as a Wellington (unless he stole it, which is highly unlikely!). It is more probable that if he was indeed in the trade of A/P u/t, then he was travelling in the Wellington as a passenger.
    Incidentally I would ignore the "received knowledge" that a Wellinton undercarriage would only stay intact for the first 65 landings, in fact I would say it was complete rubbish with no foundation whatsoever. Many Wellingtons (those NOT shot down or crashed for any reason) were in service for many years without any undercarriage trouble at all. I would say that the weakest part of the Wellington design was the fabric covering, which gradually lost strength in normal service, and older aircraft would require a complete "new skin" after a couple of years of flying and standing around on airfields in the open in the challenging European climate - there were just too many aircraft in WW2 to have them kept in hangars, and they had to be widely disperesed on their home airfields in any case due to the possibility of enemy attack on the field. In any case a collapsing undercarriage on landing did not always result in the loss of the aircraft and all its crew, quite often the occcupants would survive such an event, particulary if the aircraft was at a much reduced weight and minus bombs and most fuel, and the aircraft itself might well be repairable, depending on the circumstances.
    David D

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    A better place to discuss W W Parkinson 1067083 is our old thread for that date:

    http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/sho...rmen-12-6-1941

    The forum search function is working and it can also be interogated by Google, helps keep topics together.
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

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