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Thread: Wartime Flying Boots

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    Default Wartime Flying Boots

    In another incarnation, I have been approached by a lady who is keen to resolve a problem regarding the initial identification of an airman, killed on an attack to Duisburg in 1944.

    Apparently, the airman was first identified as LACON and buried as such. However, it seems that the identification was made because of a label inside the man's flying boots. His real name was S A Jarvis and the error was corrected when the grave was concentrated subsequently.

    Does anybody know if flying boots were manufactured by a company called Lacon, whether the boots were a particular style of boot, rather than a manufacturer's name or if they can point me - and by extension this lady - in the right direction.

    PLEASE no smart remarks such as; 'who will foot the bill for this research' or 'put a sock in it' or even 'just leg it round to the local library'!

    Colin Cummings

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    Colin, Hi,
    Nobody seems to want to play with you?
    The following may be chasing the wrong wild geese up the wrong gum trees!
    In the 60’s/70’s we used to hump a lot of our MMU kit from one Mobile Det to the next in “LACON boxes”. These were stout aluminium boxes (came in several sizes and had closing hasps which could be locked). Putting LACON into Google gives all sorts of answers – but a location in Illinois, aluminium boxes, and shoes(!!) seem to come up quite often (in various combinations). Might be that the firm is still in existence? Best I can do!
    Might give you a foothold? Ho-Ho!! See you up the gum tree!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 14th November 2014 at 14:51.
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Colin,
    Perhaps LACON was only part of the 'label'.
    Leading aircraftsmen ON?????. Lac ON etc.
    Borrowed flying boots or mix up in crew lockers!

    S A Jarvis is well documented on 550sqn website.


    Paul H

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    But by 1944 all aircrew were NCOs - so there would have been no LACs? Nice try to confuse the issue! Like it! Wish I'd thought of that!!!
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    There are a number of "Lacons" in the CWGC list, no aircrew for WW2, but as there is a chance that it could still be the surname of someone, it might pay to see if anyone has the 550sqdn ORB for a look through, as still could have been borrowed boots.... only a suggestion

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    Dear All
    I have a photo of x4 1941 aircrew posing with a Corporal who is wearing 1940 pattern flying boots. An ex ground crew and an ex air crew of the era could not explain why he has them. Frank Stone of 83 Squadron was shot down as an LAC 1 (I think ) and spent much of the war in Sagan. He is well documented in his sweeping the floor of hut 104 during the Great Escape. I suspect that LAC O.N. may be a possibility.
    My brother who was an FAA pilot was always having kit nicked, but I am sure he liberated stuff himself! There was always a lucrative market in 2nd hand stuff too.
    Best wishes
    James

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    Hi James,
    Frank Stone was an AC2 when shot down with 83sqdn.
    Regards....Alan.

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    Dear Alan
    Thank you. I was doing it from memory, hence the 'I think'. Would you know if he was in the North Compound as a Batman or for another reason?
    Best wishes
    James

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    James,

    When the Sergeants moved out of Sagan to Heydekrug, there were quite a few NCO's left, not many of which would have been Batmen, etc. The crew of HSL 108, all NCO's bar the captain plus the WOp/AG from my Father's aircraft stayed, but they were all mates. What excuse they gave, l do not know.

    You will know that by a certain date, all aircrew had to be the rank of Sergeant or above, so this meant immediate promotion for most and it quickly caught up with those in POW camps. One of the guys in my Father's hut was an LAC on capture quite late in the war but a WO by the time of his release. For most, that promotion was much slower.

    Regards,

    Nick
    KenFentonsWar.com

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    Dear Nick
    I think that Frank Stone ended up as a WO1 he was in so long. My query on him being in the North Compound was because it was predominantly for officers. Did a few NCOs slip through the net or was he there on purpose?
    Best wishes
    James

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