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Thread: Wing Commander F.L. Pearce et all

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    Default Wing Commander F.L. Pearce et all

    One of the earliest DSO's of WW2 were awarded to:
    • Wing Commander Frederick Laurence PEARCE (09078).
    • Wing Commander William Ernest STATON, M.C., D.F.C. (04225).
    • Squadron Leader John Robert HALLINGS-POTT (26043)


    https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/...upplement/1055

    I would be grateful if someone could help me with the citations/recommendations for these awards

    In any case Merry Christmas to all


    Jelle

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    Hi Jelle

    Check the entries on these three on my website www.rafweb.org but I can't remember if I've got the citations on there

    Malcolm

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    Hi Malcolm,
    Yes, your website is very useful indeed but the citations are not in I'm afraid.

    Jelle

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    I fear this is the best that I can do (which obviously is not much):

    PEARCE, Frederick Laurence, W/C - No.269 Squadron - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1940. Biographical material from “Air of Authority” website. Born 9 August 1898. A 2nd Lieutenant in RAF as of 1 April 1918; promoted Lieutenant, 13 October 1918. Qualified as Flying Instructor, No.1 Flying Training School, 15 March 1921. To be pilot in No.100 Squadron, 1 July 1922. To instruct at No.2 Flying Training School, 1 September 1923. To be pilot, No.17 Squadron, 23 November 1925. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 January 1927. Attended a course at RAF Training Base, Leuchars. To be Commanding Officer, No 440 (Fleet Spotter Reconnaissance) Flight. To RAF Depot, 20 September 1930. To staff of RAF Training Base Leuchars; to be Flight Commander, No.100 Squadron, 5 October 1933. To commad No.824 Squadron, Fleet Air Army. Promoted Squadron Leader, 1 December 1935. To RAF Depot at Gosport, 4 May 1937. To be Maintenance Liaison Officer, Headquarters, No.5 (Bomber) Group. Promoted Wing Commander, 1 January 1939. Given command of No.269 Squadron, June 1939. Awarded DFC, 12 July 1940, for services with No.269 Squadron. To Air Staff, Headquarters, Coastal Command, 8 August 1940. Promoted Group Captain, 1 March 1941. Appointed Acting Air Commodore, 12 October 1943 on appointment as Senior Air Staff Officer, No. 16 Group; confirmed in that rank, 1 October 1946. Mentioned in Despatches, 14 June 1945. To be Air Officer Commanding, Air Headquarters, Ceylon, 27 August 1949. Retired 17 March 1952. Died 3 December 1975.

    STATON, William Ernest, W/C, MC, DFC - No.10 Squadron - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1940. Born 27 August 1898. Commissioned 2nd Lieutenant, 4 May 1917; appointed Flying Officer, 21 September 1917. Joined No.62 Squadron in France, January 1918 at the age of 19; appointed Flight Commander, June 1918. By September 1918 he had accounted for 25 enemy aeroplanes. Awarded MC plus DFC and Bar. See Cross and Cockade, Volume 17, No.4 with a history of No.62 Squadron and many references to him. Obtained permanent commission in the RAF, 1 August 1919 in rank of Flying Officer. Pilot in No.20 Squadron, 12 January 1920. To RAF Depot, supernumerary (sick), 30 April 1922. To be pilot with Marine Aircraft Experimental Establishment, 16 September 1922. Promoted Flight Lieutenant, 1 January 1925. To staff of RAF Base Calshot, 11 May 1927. Attended course at Calshot, 18 September 1928; to be Staff Instructor, Calshot, 6 March 1929. To be pilot in No.205 Squadron, 17 January 1931; supernumerary to RAF Depot, 28 February 1934; appointed Adjutant and Flying Instructor, No.501 (Auxiliary) Squadron, 18 June 1934. Promoted Squadron Leader, 1 February 1935. Appointed to personnel staff, Headquarters Inland Area, 15 February 1935. Appointed Chief Flying Instructor, No.3 Flying Training School, 20 April 1935. To be Flight Commander and in charge of conversion training, No.76 Squadron (Whitleys), 30 May 1938. To command No.10 Squadron (Whitleys), 10 June 1938. When he joined No.10 Squadron he acquired the nickname “King Kong”, owing to his size. Flying on the early operations of Bomber Command in the Second World War, he soon realised that bombing accuracy was well below the desired level and attempted to improve the results of his squadron by marking targets with flares and Very lights. This experience led to him suggesting the formation of a specialist target marking force, which would eventually produce the Pathfinder Force (later No 8 Group). Promoted Wing Commander, 1 July 1938. Promoted Group Captain, 1 December 1940 and made Officer Commanding, Station Leeming. To be Senior Air Staff Officer, Headquarters RAF Far East, Singapore until captured, February 1942 (or 10 March 1942 ?). On release he was appointed Air Officer Commanding No.46 Group, 1945. serving to 1947. Promoted Air Commodore, 1 January 1946. Promoted Air Vice-Marshal, 5 April 1949. Appointed Commandant, Central Bombing Establishment until 1949. Awarded CB, 1947. Appointed Air Officer Administration, Technical Training Command, 5 April 1949. Retired 12 November 1952. Died at Emsworth, Hampshire, 22 July 1983.

    STATON, William Ernest, W/C, DSO, MC, DFC - No.10 Squadron - Bar to Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 11 June 1940. Text copied from Flight dated 13 June 1940.

    This officer has continued to display outstanding gallantry and leadership in recent air operations. One night in May 1940 he led an attack on the oil depot at Bremen. The target was very heavily defended and difficult to identify owing to the exceptional number of searchlights, but after worrying and misleading the defences for an hour, he dived and attacked from 1,000 feet to ensure hitting the target. His aircraft was hit by six shells but he succeeded in reaching his home base. Wing Commander Staton organizes and leads his squadron on all new tasks with constant courage and his work on his station is magnificent.

    HALLINGS-POTT, John Robert, S/L - No.25 Squadron, North Weald - Distinguished Service Order - awarded as per London Gazette dated 20 February 1940. Mention in Despatches, 14 June 1945 and 1 January 1946. (Acting Air Commodore). Awarded CBE, 1 January 1946.

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    Many thanks Hugh for this tremendous amount of information. The citations may not be in there but it did provide me with valuable information.

    Regarding Staton I found some articles reporting he received the DSO for a raid on the air base on Sylt:
    http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/newspap...322-1.2.2.aspx : "flew 20 minutes over the island in spite of intense anti-aircraft fire and dropped parachute flares so that his bomber crew would see the target clearly. Then he turned back and found that the objective was successfully bombed."

    http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/40868484

    Some more information on the website of Dix Noonan including the recommendation for the 2nd DSO
    http://www.dnw.co.uk/auction-archive...6&lot_id=94739

    So I'll keep searching for that citation of Staton's first DSO- as well as of the other two

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    Hi,
    There is an amusing episode in 102 Squadron’s records regarding “Crackem” Staton of 10 Squadron and the bombing of Sylt on 19/20th March 1940. This was the first time a German land target was bombed and it seems the Squadrons involved were keen to get a bit of glory, except all the glory went to 10 and 51 Squadrons at Dishforth with 102 at Driffield barely getting a mention.
    Something had to be done…






    24th March LEAFLET RAID ON DISHFORTH
    Three officers proceeded by private car to Dishforth with the intention of distributing in the Officers’ Mess 5000 leaflets to commemorate the description published in the newspapers of the exploits of the personnel of that Station, who were reported as having been the first to reach and bomb the island of Sylt on the night of 19th March. The leaflets were successfully distributed throughout the Mess premises and all the officers returned safely to base.






    27th March LEAFLET RAID ON DRIFFIELD
    Two aircraft From Dishforth carried out a leaflet raid on this aerodrome in retaliation for the raid undertaken on the 24th March. Owing however, to a miscalculation in the direction and velocity of the wind, the raid was only partially successful, some of the leaflets reaching for a distance of five miles from the camp.



    Unfortunately the original is barely legible but this is what was printed:-



    Fle Fle Oh Driffield
    You didn’t have to tell us,
    Honours lie easily on our heads,
    You must be frightfully jealous,


    But then you came in rather late,
    Still—-it must be galling,
    To have your thunder stolen away,
    We sympathise—-It’s appalling.


    Rumours reach us of your navigation,
    Spread by that lying jade;
    Of your “Drivers” hitting the wrong constellation,
    Over Hunland—-where a landing was made.


    And there are tales of indiscriminate bombing,
    On mackerel in the North Sea,
    But we’re nice and accept all these stories
    With a large pinch of S.Y.L.T.


    But we’re BIG and we wish you the best of luck,
    And when your next job is ”on,”
    Remember we’ll always help you out.
    Lots of love—10 and 51.






    Rgds


    Pete
    Last edited by pete102; 24th December 2014 at 14:51.

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    Many thanks for writing this down Pete. Nice leaflets indeed. It shows healthy competition.
    Flight Magazine also ads some word-play in the bombing of Sylt:
    Sylt Remover
    WHILST Wing Commander W. E.
    Staton, with his bombers, has been
    busy doing his best to blow Sylt into
    the water, his brother, Mr. M. N. Staton,
    service manager of Metafiltration Co.,
    Ltd., does his best to remove silt from
    the drinking and radiator water of the
    R.A.F.

    http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchi...?search=staton

    Best regards
    Jelle

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    Clearly, they did not approach their local, tame, Met Man for a MEDW (Mean Equivalent Drop Wind) for this leaflet escapade! You should know, though, that the problem did not go away. It had to be demonstrated to 'The Brass' on Ascension (Op CORPORATE) that leaflets dropped can be, and are, subject to the MEDW. Anything that comes out of an aeroplane is subject (a) to gravity, and (b) the MEDW. QED!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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