Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Cause of death help

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,752
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts

    Default Cause of death help

    Just wondering if anyone can help out with the cause of death of the following airmen; the original request for information appears in the following thread http://100548.activeboard.com/t59258...orks-cemetery/)

    Leading Aircraftman GEORGE ROBSON
    No 952840
    Died 2 March 1942
    Age 26
    Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve
    Born in Thirsk? 1916?
    Son of George and Jane Robson (nee Welsh) husband of Margaret Elizabeth Robson all living in Thirsk

    Leading Aircraftman Alexander Smith
    No 1020713
    Died 3 February 1945
    Age 36
    Date/location Born no details
    Son of Alexander and Carline Smith of Thirsk; Husband of Ethel May Smith of Norby near Thirsk

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northumberland, UK
    Posts
    3,885
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 68 Times in 65 Posts

    Default

    ROBSON 952840 - Air Britain's 'The Hampden File' (page 100) states that he was killed in Hampden I N9090 of 5 B.G.S., which crashed off Jurby Head, Isle of Man during a weather test flight. Also lost were Sgt Donald Klein Swain, RCAF, and LAC Robert William Aisbett.

    SMITH 1020713 - was included in Alex's 'Unaccounted Airmen' list here a few weeks back:

    http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/sho...men-03-02-1945

    Regards

    Simon

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,752
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts

    Default

    Thanks Simon

    I have forwarded the information.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    621
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Steve Poole (I.O.M.) researched Hampden N9090

    A Sgt Arthur Dimond (Blenheim Nav Exercise) was detailed along with Sgt Donald Swain (Hampden N9090 claimed as a weather test).

    Sgt Dimond (Blenheim) was recalled due to deteriorating weather and he could see the Hampden in front of him also in the circuit for landing, which disappeared into cloud. From the ground at the Aerodrome from the edge of the runway a Flt Lt Leslie Potter saw the Hampden in the distance with the undercarriage down and at about 200 feet the Hampden just dived into the ground. A strong wind was blowing and the visibility poor, but Potter did not state wind direction.

    According to Roberts the Hampden crashed 1 mile North of Jurby Airfield, would you see an undercarriage down, from a mile away?

    The Hampden of Sgt Swain crashed at Ballagarraghyn Jurby at about 11.45am to 12.00 on 2 March 1942. Aisbett spelt LAC Robert Aisbitt and the other crew LAC George Robson. Hampden N9090 was originally built as a Hereford by Short Bros. and Harland at Belfast in June/July 1940. In the Isle of Man enquiries you get the build date it seems, too? The original engines had been changed for a different make.

    Mark
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 26th December 2014 at 12:04.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,644
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts

    Default

    Point of Ayre Lighthouse 2 Mar 42
    0700GMT Wind SSE F7 (28-33 kts) Vis 6 (scale of 0-9) Cloud 9/10ths 1500 ft
    1300GMT Wind SE F6 (22-27 kts) Vis 6 Cloud 9/10ths 1000 ft
    (not exactly Gp Capt’s weather but flyable?)
    1 sm N of Jurby Airfield is the coast - probably turning 'finals' for Runway 16?
    You could see an undercarriage down at 1 sm depending on the light level and background.
    If I had to bet some of your money on the cause it would go on "downdraughts" over the coast (do a GE extended centre-line for Jurby R34, and then get its profile - QED).
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 26th December 2014 at 13:18.
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,514
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts

    Default

    With my met hat on, could I ask what is meant by a "weather test flight"? I've not come across the term before, a "weather check flight" or maybe a "met check/reconnaissance flight", but never "test". What time did the accident happen? Has anyone accessed the F1180; if so what were the conclusions/recommendations of the BoI? The Daily Register of hourly observations for Jurby can be found in the Met Office Archives.

    Brian

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    621
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Thanks Peter

    Some pieces relating to Jurby Aerodrome I.O.M., apparently only 26/08 roughly east-west existed until 1942 at Jurby Airfield.

    Ballagarraghyn Farm Jurby District, near the coast is about 1 mile North of Jurby Aerodrome.

    When the sun is shining it is a most beautiful part of the Island and in the summer has far better weather than Douglas.

    It was such a shame. The Blenheim had been recalled back to Jurby as a precaution due to deteriorating weather and Sgt Swain’s Hampden aircraft dived to the ground from 200 feet.

    Yes Brian, I pondered over the “Sergeant Swain was to take a Hampden up on a weather test and Sergeant Dimond was flying a Blenheim, on a navex exercise.” – Steve Poole’s book. According to the Inquest they came back more or less together.

    Nicholas Roberts book refers to Hampden N9090 of 5 AOS [Air Observer School] stalling and “On weather testing flight.”, with a time of 12.00 hours.

    Perhaps the Deemster (Coroner) was pressing as to why the fatal flight was started? On the IOM RAF Inquiries were subject to a Manx Inquest, who it seemed attended the RAF Inquiry? Here on the mainland, the Inquest and RAF Inquiries were separate in accord with WW2 King's Regs.







    September 1951 Chart
    Last edited by Mark Hood; 26th December 2014 at 19:24.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •