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Thread: Anson - ditched/accident report 1944

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    Default Anson - ditched/accident report 1944

    Good Evening,

    22nd December 1944 an Avro Anson "729" serving with 1322 ADLS (Air Delivery Letter Service/Squadron) possibly flying from RAF Northolt en route to Brussels had to make an emergency landing due to bad weather and ditched in the Solent. (south england) the aircraft was later salvaged.
    Are their records, accident reports, would these incidents have been recorded? are they available to download or obtain a copy from the archives ?
    Also are their any combat reports available for these units, similar to the bomber command files ?

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    For the Accident Card F1180 you need to contact RAF Museum, Hendon and request a copy.

    It is filed under the correct aircraft serial of NK729 in microfilm MF16-81.

    F/Sgt S J Burton, 1586897 was the pilot.

    Regards
    Ross
    The Intellectual Property contained in this message has been assigned specifically to this web site.
    Copyright Ross McNeill 2015/2018 - All rights reserved.

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    http://www.dnw.co.uk/auctions/catalo...329&lot_id=734


    An unusual Second World War A.F.M. awarded to Flying Officer S. J. Burton, Royal Air Force, who was decorated for his services as a pilot in Ansons of the Air Despatch Letter Service and elected to the membership of the Goldfish Club on having to ditch in the Solent in December 1944: his aircraft was ‘shot up by Me. 109s and Fw. 190s’ on returning from a similar mission to Brussels a little over a week later

    Air Force Medal, G.VI.R. (1586897 F./Sgt. S. J. Burton, R.A.F.), in its Royal Mint case of issue, together with his Goldfish Club embroidered uniform badge, extremely fine (2) 2000-2500
    Footnote

    A.F.M. London Gazette 3 April 1945. The original recommendation states:

    ‘Flight Sergeant Burton is employed as a pilot on Air Despatch Letter Service and has completed 25 flights between the United Kingdom and the Continent, many of them in appalling weather conditions. On 22 December 1944, when flying to Brussels, poor visibility and fog prevented him reaching the French coast and he decided to return to England. The weather was too bad to land and he was forced to alight in the Solent. He ensured that the official mail was safe by placing it in the dinghy and he alighted on the water so efficiently that his Anson aircraft floated and was able to be towed ashore and salved.’

    Sidney John Burton, who was born in October 1916, commenced his pilot training at No. 20 E.F.T.S. at Oshawa, Ontario, in April 1943. Returning to the U.K. at the end of the same year, he attended No. 4 E.F.T.S. at Brough and No. 1531 Beam Approach Squadron at Cranage before joining Transport Command’s Air Despatch Letter Service (A.D.L.S.) at Northolt in September 1944. It was in this capacity that he was to be awarded his A.F.M. for the completion of 25 hazardous sorties to the Continent, including the occasion of his ditching in the Solent in December 1944. A little over a week later, as stated, his Anson was ‘shot up by Me. 109s and Fw. 190s’ (his flying log book entry, 1 January 1945, refers). Burton, who was promoted to Flying Officer in June 1945, remained employed on the continental run with the A.D.L.S. until the war’s end.

    Sold with a quantity of original documentation, including the recipient’s R.C.A.F. Pilot’s Flying Log Book, covering the period April 1943 to June 1945; Buckingham Palace forwarding letter for his A.F.M., together with related inscribed box and registered envelope; Goldfish Club membership card in the name of ‘P./O. S. J. Burton’, dated 22 December 1944, and forwarding letter for his embroidered uniform badge; his R.A.F. identity card, with portrait photograph, dated 10 September 1944, and two photographs from his training days in Canada
    Last edited by alieneyes; 23rd February 2015 at 20:40.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ross_McNeill View Post
    For the Accident Card F1180 you need to contact RAF Museum, Hendon and request a copy.

    It is filed under the correct aircraft serial of NK729 in microfilm MF16-81.

    F/Sgt S J Burton, 1586897 was the pilot.

    Regards
    Ross
    Excellent thank you Ross, be an interesting story.

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