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Thread: May 13, 1944 Transatlantic Mossie

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    Default May 13, 1944 Transatlantic Mossie

    There's Packard engines ad over on evil-bay featuring a drawing of a Mosquito, with the headline that such an aircraft had set a transatlantic record on the date in question using Packards.

    Can't for the life of me read what the elapsed time was. Does anyone have details on this flight?

    TIA,

    Mark

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    The 13 May 1944 time from Labrador to Northern Ireland was 6 hours, 46 minutess having flown 2,290 miles.

    A

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    Thanks Amrit - was that Wooldridge's flight?

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    Default Transatlantic Mossie

    mhuxt,

    Flight Magazine of 18 May 1944, contained the following article:
    MOSQUITO CREATES ATLANTIC RECORD
    The shore-to-shore Atlantic record between Labrador and Britain was lowered to 5hr. 40 min. last week-end by one of the first two Canadian-built Mosquitoes to fly non-stop to this country on the R.A.F. Transport Command's route; time from take-off at Goose Bay to an inland base in Britain was 6hr. 4&min. Wing Cdr. J. de L. Wooldridge. who piloted the aircraft, was making his first trans-Atlantic flight. He had previously been in command of a Mosquito squadron in this country, and at the termination of a duty visit to America volunteered to ferry a Mosquito back to Britain. The second was but little slower.
    Wing Commander Wooldridge was accompanied on the trip by F/O C. J. Brown as Navigator.

    Regards,

    Wee Gerry

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    Many thanks for that Gerry:

    I suspected it might have been Wooldridge, though the de Havilland film / video I have at home (I'm *such* a nerd) says the best time was eventually 5 1/2 hours.

    I don't know if any Canadian-built Mosquito fighters / fighter-bombers were ferried non-stop, but I'd love to find out.

    I believe the other Mosquito referred to in the article was piloted by none other than Kirk Kerkorian, now a wealthier-than-Gawd investor / hotel magnate in Vegas.

    Cheers,

    Mark

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    Mark,

    The Putnam volume on DH aircraft states in the entry covering the Mosquito records states that "routine delivery flights to the United Kingdom by the Northern Route, the best time, made in April 1945, being 5 hours 30 minutes."

    And that "After the war Mosquito P.R. Mk.34s RG241 and RG238 made record breaking flights. The first flown by Wing Cdr J.R.H. Merrifield D.S.O., D.F.C. and F/Lt. J. H. Spires D.F.C., D.F.M. made the east-west crossing of the Atlantic from St. Mawgan to Gandar on September 6, 1945 in 7 hours and returned on October 23rd in 5 hours 10 minutes." The second record was a flight over the Lodon-Cape Town route.

    Errol

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    Many thanks Errol.

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