Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Buried bombers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Normandy/Paris, France
    Posts
    118
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Buried bombers

    Hello,

    I have come across an article dated of year 1990 that stated that 6 lancasters and a Hamilcar had been entombed (buried in sections) in perfect condition at the end of the war somewhere in 'South Humberside' (Lincolnshire). An enormous labour of burying because it is written that if they were excavated they could fly again!
    According to the article, there was a witness of the burying and thanks to him local radar photos made the proof of this and excavations were planned by Dr Percival Baker, a former Lancaster pilot and secretary of The Bomber Airfield Society.
    Could this be real? And, if yes, where are they now?
    Thanks in advance.
    Regards.

    Bruno
    Bruno LECAPLAIN
    Raf WWII 38 Group Squadrons Reunited <www.raf38group.org>
    Stirling Aircraft Society <stirlingaircraftsoc.raf38group.org>

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Bewdley, UK
    Posts
    2,700
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    No,

    Explanation for lack of finds was they had corroded leaving a 'ghost' of high conductivity soil.

    Could not see how the massive castings of the u/c could disappear myself in such a short time span and as such I treat the discovery with extreme scepticism.

    Regards
    Ross

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Brugge, Belgium
    Posts
    318
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Found some posts of Febr. 2004 on the Key Aviation forum that deal with this subject.
    They speak of Elsham of place of burial, and 3 Lancasters. There has been some digging, but because of type of soil not much seems to be left of the bombers.

    Had to open the cache file, website itself is down for maintenance for the moment.

    Site: forum.keypublishing.co.uk/archive/index.php?t-21882.html

    Regards,

    Leendert

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Normandy/Paris, France
    Posts
    118
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Ross, Leendert,

    A mistery solved!
    I agree with you. The state in which they found the aircraft is strange after a so shirt time. The choice of the soil seems to have been a big mistake.
    Thanks very much for your replies.
    Regards.

    Bruno
    Bruno LECAPLAIN
    Raf WWII 38 Group Squadrons Reunited <www.raf38group.org>
    Stirling Aircraft Society <stirlingaircraftsoc.raf38group.org>

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Shepperton
    Posts
    732
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Buried a/c

    Seems a lot of hard work to me. Why would anyone have bothered burying surplus WWII a/c in a way so as to preserve them anyway?

    More likely they'd just be dumped in a hole in the ground and covered-over without any attempts being made to provide for their long-term preservation?

    Ian

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    12
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    I remember at around the same time, a guy was on local radio in Northamptonshire, Lincolnshire etc with plans to dig up about 12 lancasters all supposedly buried in sections. The idea was to build a museum representing a squadron as it would have been on an airfield during the war... I also remember most people dismissing the idea as pure folly. I believe folk lore around many airfields speaks of trenches being dug at the end of the war and aircraft, cars, lorries etc being pushed into them. Maybe this is an extension of such tales. Regards Steve

  7. #7
    fiskerton Guest

    Default buried lancs

    hi all
    ive come across this, what is probebly a myth
    the airfield stated was east kirkby and that a search had been undertaken
    with an engine block the size of the merlin if they were there a decent magnet dragged across the ground would have found them
    Timeteam from the Uk television will have to be called in to find them
    some one call the BBC in london
    whilst there would be a rubbish dump of sorts at all military bases
    any damaged airframes would have been salvaged for futher use in the war effort
    nothing usefull would have been buried
    at the end of the war at RAF Clifton york they dismantled airframes
    the pile of alluminium could be ssen towering over the rural countryside the size of a colliery slag heap
    my freinds father worked at RAF Burn dismantelling not only airframes but also army tanks
    my uncle a W/op with 576 sqn at fiskerton told me after the war he remambers driving up the A19 to Selby .passing Burn and seeing the airfield full of lancs and halifax,s

    also for the lads who replied to my query over W/cmdr Boyd drayton Sellick
    ive found out that he died in jan 1999 aged 82 in the peterbourgh area of the uk

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •