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Thread: Help On rank and other details

  1. #1
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    Default Help On rank and other details

    hi

    New to all this so apologies if duplication or stupid question. Just got my dads service record and have a couple of questions.
    Firstly his rank starts at AC2 on 1/43, goes to T/Sgt 1/45, then F/Sgt 1/46 but then back to AC2 1/46 and then back to T/Sgt 7/46. Any ideas what may have caused this, and what is the T for in front of Sgt?
    Secondly he has a number of Units ie 2 AGs, 85 OTU, 11OTU , 75 base, STn(?) Blyton and 12 S of IT, 31 R&C Wing. Although I have looked for abbreviations I cant seem to find any details on these.
    Either thanks or apologies in advance !
    P
    Last edited by pjac1410; 1st May 2015 at 21:37.

  2. #2
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    AC2 = Aircraftman 2nd Class (other than an officer cadet, the lowest known form of animal life!!!)
    T/Sgt = Temporary Sergeant
    F/Sgt = Flight Sergeant

    There was a complicated system of acting, temporary, substantive, war substantive ranks in operation throughout and after the war and this led eventually to the aircrew ranks being changed to Pilot II, Nav III etc and many who remained in the RAF post-war having their ranks and seniority reassessed. Too difficult to explain here!!

    AGS = Air Gunners School
    OTU = Operational Training Unit
    75 Base = a collection of RAF stations collected together and sharing some things. The main station was the 'base' to which you were posted/attached and then farmed out to a station if appropriate.
    SofTT = School of Technical Training
    R&C Wing = um err oh can't think offhand
    STn = station and the mix of capitals and lower case is probably just a typo
    Blyton = a bomber base not too far from Retford

    Hope this gets you going. Incidentally, numbered organisations often moved around so you will need to link the organisation to a date to be sure you've got the right place.

    Colin Cummings

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    Many thanks for your reply. On the rank i thought dad may have been demoted for some charge/misdemeanour.!!!


    How and where should i go about finding info on otu. Also he was at hcu 1660 ar swinderby but after training at otu why would that be.


    Please excuse my ignorance (but its all very confusing!), . I promise no more questions !!


    Thanks

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    Keep asking, as it is one of the best way of learning!

    The Operational Training Unit enabled individual crew members, who had been trained in their respective trades, to "crew up" and train on two-engined medium bombers (crew of 5 - pilot, navigator, air bomber, wireless operator and air gunner). The Heavy Conversion Unit enabled them train on four-engined heavy bombers (crew of 7 - pilot, navigator, air bomber, wireless operator, two air gunners and a flight engineer).

    Having completed this training they were ready for operational service.

    Regards

    Pete
    Last edited by PeteT; 3rd May 2015 at 08:48.
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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    To add to Pete's response, you might encounter the term: LFS in your research. This stands for Lancaster Finishing School and was a way of ensuring crews going to the Lancaster were adequately prepared.

    With many crew specialists being trained in Canada and elsewhere overseas, pilots, navigators and air bombers would normally go through an Advanced Flying Unit to acclimatise them - in more ways than one - to operating in the weather and geographical conditions of NW Europe. It was after this period that they would go to the OTU, as Pete has described.

    BTW, if you sent me a private message, it was rejected by the system because my mailbox was full - smacked botty and no tea!!!! Please repeat if still required.

    Colin Cummings

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    I would suggest that Blyton, the home of 1662 HCU, is where he did his heavy conversion training.

    Regards,

    Dave

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