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Thread: Duties of returning evaders.

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    Default Duties of returning evaders.

    Duties of returning evaders.

    I seem to recall that it was policy that returning evaders were not to ne returned to aircrew duties. Presumably so that in the event of being captured at a later date, could nit divulge any resistance secrets.
    If so what would they have done? Tutor in escape and evasion?

    Iím looking at RW Daniel of 35 squadron.

    My thanks in advance.

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    Hello,

    It might help if you explain that your R. W. Daniel, is, in fact, AUS413833 Ronald William DANIEL RAAF (later F/L AFC, MiD, O22020).

    Col.

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    Thank you Col.
    I had found the MID entry and service with 50 squadron in the Korean war but could not clearly say it was the same person.Your findings support it being the same person, so I will follow that lead.

    Thanks for your interest and time.
    Paul

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    Again my thanks Col.
    I found a reference to RW Daniel of 50 squadron, but it may refer to a period between his 35 squadron posting(Halifax HR985 lost 11/11/1943) and the end of ww2. It says there is a reference to him in "Silk and Barbed Wire" p195. giving his number as 022020 so a bit of confusion.

    Paul

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    I appreciate this isn't a "straightforward" evader example, but I include it as it's relevant to the discussion: in October 1944 Halifax FS-G of 148 (SD) Sqdn crashed after making a supply drop in mountains to Yugoslav partisans; Sgt C.W.T. Bromage (A/G) survived the crash and made contact with local partisans. He was passed between groups to a British (SOE) Mission and eventually returned to Italy by plane; it's not clear if this was an established route for Allied personnel, although in his report he mentions a number of others who he encountered on the same or a similar route to repatriation.

    However Sgt Bromage subsequently returned to flying duties with 148 Sqdn, all the more surprising given the secrecy with which Special Duties work was shrouded: at this time crews in 148 commonly lived and socialised as fairly discrete units, were briefed separately for separate operations, etc., with the intention at least in part of maintaining security. I assume this return to operations was squadron policy, as he flew on several more until VE Day put an end to the squadron's role in the Balkans.

    Cheers, Pat

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    Quote Originally Posted by paulh View Post
    I seem to recall that it was policy that returning evaders were not to ne returned to aircrew duties.
    There was certainly no such policy for fighter pilots. I have recently prepared a paper on Polish fighter pilots missing over occupied Europe between 1 January 1941 and D-Day. 14 of them evaded capture and returned to Britain, and all of these subsequently resumed flying duties with operational fighter squadrons. Five were subsequently killed, one was missing and evaded again, and one volunteered to become a SOE agent in France, completed this mission, and resumed his duties as a Spitfire pilot with an operational squadron before the war ended.
    I haven't done any detailed research into bomber air crews, but I know there was at least one Polish bomber pilot who evaded twice, so obviously he was not grounded after his first evasion.

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    I haven't had a chance to look this up at all, but could it have been escapers who would've been barred from further operational duties instead of evaders? On the basis that having previously been in enemy custody, then escaping, then being captured a second time round at a later date would invite heavy questioning as to how they'd got away first time round. On the other hand, evaders who had never been 'on the enemy's books' wouldn't be quizzed in that way?

    Just a thought.

    Ian

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    Thanks Ian, that makes areay deal of sense.
    Paul

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