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Thread: orb look up please

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    Default orb look up please

    Hi Please may i ask if anyone has a copy of the No 1 & 15 FTS ORB'S

    i wondered if anyone may look up the following from the ORB'S if they have a copy .

    1/ 1. FTS, Battle P6633 , 7/8/41 Force landing Pilot Sub/Lt HI Shanahan

    2/ 15 FTS, Oxford V3646 , 8/11/41, put down safely in field but crashed taking off again Pilot LAC FGA Reynolds 1232882 badly hurt , it would seem he survived the war he had trained at No 11 EFTS .

    I am keen to know if the ORB has anything to add to these incidents i have the 1180's for both incidents but seeking more on the crash's or the pilots involved .

    Thank you
    Phill Jones

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    Hi,
    I know it's a reply to an older thread, but I may be able to help.

    Pilot LAC F.G.A. Reynolds I believe was my Grandfather. He did survive his injuries and once recovered flew with the ATA for the remainder of the war. I don't have any more detail to hand, but we do have his wings and flight notes in the family.

    He passed away in the mid-1990s before I got to have a good talk with him about it all.

    Just for interest, do you know where the crash happened?

    Thanks,

    Andrew.
    Last edited by Hammerhe4d; 13th October 2015 at 11:47. Reason: Daft spelling and grammar mistakes

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    To confirm that Francis George Reynolds flew with the ATA as a Second Officer.
    Taken from "Brief Glory. The story of A.T.A.".

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    Hello Andrew,

    Air-Britain's "Oxford, Consul & Envoy File" (p.100), has the following for Oxford II V3646 - 15 SFTS 12.1.41; hit tree on take-off from forced landing 1m NW of Builth Road Station, Radnor 8.11.41.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 13th October 2015 at 13:02.

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    Col (et al), Hi,
    It is not clear, from your script, whether the point of impact of V3646 was 1m NW of Builth Road railway station, or whether that was where the 'forced landing' had occurred? And, in any case, what was an LAC doing Driving an Airframe? Had he got his Wings, and they had not been promulgated? Or is there some other answer? I have an old RAF colleague who lives in Builth Wells. I can ask him if he knows anything of this episode if necessary?
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Good Evening Gents ,thank you to all who have Commented on this thread , i can add the following .
    Firstly , taken from local records

    On the 8/11/41 ,an aeroplane landed in a field at Dolerw Farm nr Builth Wells . The pilot ,the sole occupant of the Aircraft ,explained to the farmer at Dolerw that he had lost his bearings and wanted to make for Oxford .After Consulting a map the pilot took off but his machine failed to clear some nearby trees with the result that it crashed and was completely wrecked ,the pilot sustaining severe multiple injuries .

    The 1180 states that the Pilot LAC 1232882 Reynolds FGA who was on a Solo X-country flt crashed on take off after making a forced landing to ascertain whereabouts . Did Not seek permission to take off again , failed to gain suff ht to clear a tree .

    The Oxford in fact hit a tree that was bordering the field in which he had landed in at Dolyrerw Farm nr Builth Rd Station .

    The 1180 states he was a LAC but off course this must be wrong and should be a Sgt he had a total of 96 hrs flying time at this stage with 45 Total on Oxfords 16 Dual and 29 Solo and i would therefore assume he would have had been awarded his wings ???? unless some one can enlighten me

    Andrew i would very much like to make contact with you about this as your Grandad's crash mentioned here is part of something much bigger and i would like to make contact with you about this Please Mail me

    thanks to all Phill Jones

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    Please forgive me for relaunching this thread , it is hoped that Hammerhe4d (Andrew ) , Grandson of FG Reynolds Pilot of Oxford V3646 Gets back to me ???

    Phill Jones

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    I don't know why some forumites are assuming that the pilot of a training aeroplane in WW2 could not be an LAC, as this classification was the STANDARD status for A/P u/t during those years. Once a trainee pilot was considered capable of flying the type of aircraft he was training on at SFTS, he could be tasked with undertaking solo training exercises, and at a certain point in training had been attained (after passing from ITS to ATS in NZ and Australia, or about half way through the "straight-through" course as used in Canada and the UK), pupil pilots were "paired up" and could carry out exercises together, the idea seemingly being that they should judge each other's efforts and provide mutual constructive criticism. Technically neither of the pupils was captain of the aircraft (although only one could be pilot at any given time), and they were expected to co-operate fully during the exercise, which sometimes required the pair to change crew positions. Occasionally paired pupils sometimes they got up to a bit of mischief, but on the whole most of them survived their SFTS course. It was not till the graduation of their course, combined with the attainment of minimum marks in a series of written and verbal examinations that the pupils would be graduated, and only then could they be promoted to the minimum rank of Sergeant, or commissioned, and be awarded their long-awaited "wings". Interestingly, in NZ (and I presume the RAAF), the pupils were technically "awarded" their wings after the end of the ITS stage (including first series of examinations), but did not actually get their sticky fingers on them until final graduation from ATS. Incidentally the two stage (ITS/ATS) system was introduced in the RAF about 1936 or 37, but was abandoned by them as well s the Canadians sometime in 1940, but the two smaller Dominions retained it till the end of the war.
    David D

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