Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Help decoding an RAF service record

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    London
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Help decoding an RAF service record

    I've obtained a copy of my father's RAF service record for the 1939 to 1945 period, if anyone can throw any light on a few questions about decoding RAF service records I'd be most grateful:

    a. In the "movements" section most unit postings list the station name, but one posting starting 1.12.43 is listed as "No 41 BASE". Does anyone know what that was or where it might be located?

    b. What was recorded in the "Special notations" section of the service record? Everything in that box has been blacked out.

    c. In the "special remarks re duties" column mostly it says "admin" so I guess he spent most of the 2nd world war doing various admin tasks (I assume he'd have been too old for active service by then as he also served in the 1st world war). However some of the special remarks are prefixed by "P)" and some by "A)". What does this signify?

    All suggestions gratefully received,

    Nick

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,766
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts

    Default

    Nick

    In response to one of your questions, No 41 Base was based at Marston Moor and was utilised in conjunction with the satellite airfields at Acaster Malbis, Rufforth and Riccall for Heavy Conversion training.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,011
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Hello Nick,
    Can I ask what was your father's trade and/or rank at the tim eof the posting?

    Bruce
    http://www.filephotoservice.co.uk/
    RESEARCH AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES & OTHER UK INSTITUTIONS

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    London
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Thanks Pete, that's great

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    London
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Bruce, my dad was a squadron leader in the Admin & Special Duties section. I believe he was RAFVR because he'd been in the Kite/Balloon section in WW1 and had rejoined the RAF in 1939 as a flight lieutenant, and was promoted to squadron leader in 1941. I have had no success in finding out precisely what he did as he never talked about it, and his service record just shows "admin" for most postings. However the record shows he attended something described as "Senior Admin (War) course (no 28)" in 1941 so that also suggests some sort of ground based administrative role. His posting to "no 41 base" was in December 1943.

    Nick

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,039
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts

    Default

    Nick,
    The letters "A" and "P" indicate "attachment" and "posting" respectively, with the former meaning he still remained on the establishment of his "parent" unit, but was temporarily attached to another unit for some purpose, and the latter unit would have to provide his accommodation and messing. For an officer this was often one and the same, although in wartime condition, accommodation was always barely adequate and most junior officers could not be accommodated in the official "Mess' and frequently lived in small huts with only slightly superior facilities to ordinary airmen. However the age and seniority of your father may have been sufficient to ensure he had proper Officer Mess accommodation. In wartime, postings were generally of longer duration than attachments, although only of vaguely determinate length when operational, but administrative positions on training and other non-operational units might be of any length, such was the expansion and development of the RAF. Attachments were usually of only fairly short duration to meet a specific need, and might be to fill a post until somebody more suited to the position could be found, or it might be to administer the initial formation of or the close down of a station or unit where an experienced hand would be of some value.
    David D

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    London
    Posts
    8
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Many thanks David, this explains a lot because the A) activities are all relatively short duration.

    Nick

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •