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Thread: Parachute And Cable (PAC) fruitfulness

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    Default Parachute And Cable (PAC) fruitfulness

    Hi all,

    I would like to ask if anyone has any information about fruitfulness of the PAC or how many aircraft were shot down by this unusual weapon and in which period of war it was used?

    TIA

    Pavel

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    Pavel,

    According this story, the device was used in the early years of the war:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/ww2peopleswar/stories/64/a6672864.shtml

    Regards,

    Leendert

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    Pavel,

    Also found this story where it is hinted (but not confirmed) that two German planes were brought down by PAC: http://www.battleofbritain.net/0028.html

    Regards,

    Leendert

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    Hi Leendert,

    thanks for useful links, I have just find out them also in Google.
    But I am interested if there are any more detailed information in any book for example? I know that it was ground defence weapon so it will be not in many books about the RAF. BUt I hope it can be mentioned somewhere...

    Pavel

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    hello Pavel,

    There's was a feature about it, by Dr Alfred Price, in Aeroplane monthly, approximately last year.

    The outcome was that it was not really successful, but I don't remember the figures.

    pm if you want to get more details

    Joss

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    Quote Originally Posted by jossleclercq View Post
    hello Pavel,

    There's was a feature about it, by Dr Alfred Price, in Aeroplane monthly, approximately last year.

    The outcome was that it was not really successful, but I don't remember the figures.

    pm if you want to get more details

    Joss
    It appeared in the issue for August 2006.

    Errol

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    The KG53 He 111 brought down at Ovington by the PAC at RAF Watton on 18 Feb 1941 was the only enemy aircraft known brought down solely by the weapon, at least in the UK. A Do 17Z was 'snared' by PAC over RAF Kenley on 18 Aug 1940, and another damaged, but the former had already been crippled by other defences.
    I also found a couple of pictures of a KG40 FW200 which RTB with a ship-borne PAC wrapped round it.
    There are a lot of myths and legends about this odd weapon, and when I was contacted in the 90s by a man who witnessed the He 111 incident in 1941, he was terrified he would be arrested under the official secrets act for disclosing what he saw that day !!!

    BC

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    Thanks a lot for additional information Bob!

    Pavel

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    Pavel,

    Reference Bob's reply above, the two Do-17 that encountered the Parachute-Cable defences at Kenley on August 18th were flown by two pilots of 9th Staffel, Bomber Geschwader 76:

    Fw Wilhelm Raab on encountering "red-glowing balls" shrouded in smoke rising in front of him as he flew over Kenley took evasive action by going into a steep bank to port in order to avoid the smoke-columns. His port wing contacted one of the cables, however his extreme bank angle allowed the cable to slide off the wing before generating enough force to activate the lower-level parachute.

    Fw Johannes Petersen was less fortunate. Already shot-up and on fire he encountered one of the cables, the contraption functioned as advertised and dragged him to earth, all killed.

    "The Hardest Day- 18 August 1940"
    Alfred Price
    Last edited by Ken MacLean; 1st June 2008 at 01:47.

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    Great Ken! Many thanks

    Pavel

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