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Thread: Airmen 'unaccounted for' 4-9-1939 AC2 T. Thomson - 621153 - 149 Sqn

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    Default Airmen 'unaccounted for' 4-9-1939 AC2 T. Thomson - 621153 - 149 Sqn

    From the Archive here

    http://www.rafcommands.com/archive/14420.php


    AC2 T. Thomson - 621153 - 149 Sqn


    From 149 Sqn ORB

    Mildenhall 4 Sept 21:50 621153 AC2 Thomson and 615404 AC2 Hoey involved in motor cycle accident in Newmarket. Ac2 Thomson died of injuries received AC2 Hoey, seriously injured detained Newmarket Rous Memorial Hospital

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    Deaths Sep 1939 (>99%)

    Thomson Thomas 18 Newmarket 4a 1146 Scan available - click to view

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    Reported in the Cambridge Daily News, September 6th 1939:

    "The story of how two aircraftmen on a motor cycle crashed into the rear of a stationary lorry and trailer, the lights of which had failed, on Monday night was told at the inquest on the driver of the motor cycle, held at the Newmarket (Suffolk) Police Station on Tuesday evening.
    He was A/C Thomas Thomson, and he as killed instantly. His companion, John Hoey, was taken to Rous Memorial Hospital, Newmarket with bad injuries....the jury returned a verdict of accidental death."

    There was also a report in the Bury Free Press of Saturday September 2nd 1939 of an AC2 John Gerard Hoey being involved in an aircraft crash near Brandon, Norfolk, NNE of RAF Lakenheath the previous Tuesday - could this be the same AC2 John Hoey?

    Regards

    Simon

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    Yes Same person

    AC2 John Gerard Hoey 615404 Air 78-78

    He had an eventful fortnight:

    Survived Aircraft Crash
    Took part in first bombing mission
    Survived motorbike Crash

    29th August 1939
    WELLINGTON L4214 of 149Sqn

    " Date: Tuesday 29 August 1939
    Aircraft: Wellington Mk Ic, L4214
    Call sign: OJ
    Squadron: 149 Squadron
    Base: RAF Mildenhall
    Captain/pilot: Pilot Officer Francis William Scott TURNER, survived
    Second pilot: Pilot Officer WATSON, severely injured
    Observer: Sergeant Anthony Frederick Adrian FREEMAN, killed #580726 -The 149 Sqn records note:
    580726 ( Not sure; rotten handwriting) Acting Sergeant Freeman, Anthony Fredrick Adrian (Observer) died in sick quarters as a result of injuries received in forced landing of Wellington L4214 near Brandon, Norfolk (Map Ref (w) G2507) entry timed at 20.35 on 29 Aug 1939.
    Wireless Operator: Sergeant Horace James WELLER, survived - 562377 Weller H.J who known as Wheller H J
    he is on CWGC as Horace James Wheller
    Air Gunner: AC2 John Gerard HOEY, survived #615404
    Air Gunner: AC2 Cecil George BARKER, survived #618162

    1939, Aug 31. Times.
    The Air Ministry regrets to announce the following flying accident. Sgt Anthony Frederick Adrian Freeman lost his life and P/O Thomas Watson was severely injured in an accident which occurred in East Anglia on August 29 to an aircraft of No. 149 Squadron. P/O Watson was a pilot of the aircraft and Acting Sgt Freeman a member of the crew. P/O Francis William Scott Turner, the Captain of the aircraft and Sgt Horace James Weller, AC2 John Gerard Hoey, and A/C2 Cecil George Barker, the other members of the crew, were not injured

    Engine caught fire on departing Mildenhall resulting in forced landing near Brandon, Norfolk where aircraft hit trees. Four days later the survivors were involved in the first operation of WWII"
    Last edited by paulmcmillan; 19th May 2016 at 16:59.

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    Wow, he certainly did.

    He was in the papers again in 1944, this time for something a little less eventful. From the Daily Herald, October 24th 1944:

    "Though congratulated on his marksmanship in killing two pheasants with one shot, John Gerard Hoey, R.A.F. officer, was fined 5 at Kestevan, Lincs, for killing game without licence out of season."

    Regards

    Simon

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    Air Ministry, 1st August, 1944.
    ROYAiL AIR FORGE.
    GENERAL DUTIES BRANCH.
    Appointment to commission.
    As Plt. Offs. on prob. (emergency): —
    Wt. Offs.

    615404 John Gerard HOEY (54957). 27th Apr.
    1944.

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    SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 2 JUNE, 1944
    Distinguished Flying Cross
    Warrant Officer John Gerard HOEY (615404), Royal Air Force. No. 83 Squadron.

    I presume that he is John G Hoey Sr, who was reported as dying by The Baltimore Sun on 2 Nov 2002:
    John G. Hoey Sr., a retired insurance salesman who earned the Distinguished Flying Cross while serving in the Royal Air Force during World War II, died of heart failure Thursday at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 84.
    Mr. Hoey, a longtime resident of Keswick Road in Roland Park, was born and raised in Dublin, Ireland. After graduating from high school, he left Ireland for England, and enlisted in the RAF in 1938.
    As a radio operator and bombardier, he made history when he was aboard one of the first planes to bomb Germany.
    His first mission aboard a Wellington bomber occurred Sept. 3, 1939, three days after the German army overran Poland.
    The target of the three Wellingtons that took off from Mildenhall Air Base in England was the German naval fleet anchored at Wilhelmshaven.
    Some 97 missions later, Mr. Hoey found himself at Normandy on D-Day in an Avro Lancaster, protecting troops as they landed on the beaches.
    "It wasn't spectacular, as far as I was concerned," he told the Baltimore Messenger, a weekly newspaper, in an interview last year. "It was just another raid."
    For his wartime exploits, he was decorated with the RAF's Distinguished Flying Cross.
    After the war, he remained in the RAF flying repatriated prisoners home and delivering relief supplies to Holland. He also flew a judge to the Nuremberg war crimes trial.
    In the late 1940s, he emigrated to Canada and then Baltimore, where he has lived since 1951. He was an insurance salesman for Nationwide Insurance Co. before retiring in 1995.
    Mr. Hoey was a member of the Paint & Powder Club and performed in many of its shows.
    An avid golfer, he was a member of the Rolling Road Country Club.


    Martyn

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