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Thread: "Nursery" - 77 Sqn 20/21 July 1941

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    Default "Nursery" - 77 Sqn 20/21 July 1941

    The 77 Sqn ORB for the above night states that Sgt Scott-Martin flew as nursery.

    Would anyone be able to explain the use of this term for a crew?

    To me it seem to indicate that the crew was new to operations.

    Regards

    Mikkel
    Britain's Victory, Denmark's Freedom. Danish Volunteers in Allied Air Forces During the Second World War
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    Anyone with a guess on this one?

    Mikkel
    Britain's Victory, Denmark's Freedom. Danish Volunteers in Allied Air Forces During the Second World War
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    danishww2pilots.dk - a resource on Danish aircrew during the Second World War

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    Sorry Mikkel, my only thought was that it might be a training flight for mine-laying (from 'nursery' to 'garden'). I've had a skim through BC ORB but no obvious mention to provide any proof.

    I hope you get to the bottom of it.

    Richard

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    Richard
    Thank you. The crew in question was briefed for a raid on Cologne, but eventually bombed Keerbergen Aerodrome. In other words, no relation to mine-laying.

    Mikkel
    Britain's Victory, Denmark's Freedom. Danish Volunteers in Allied Air Forces During the Second World War
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    Hi Mikkel,

    accidentally I came accross the "nursery" term in the ORB of 10 Sq in aerly 1941. I would say you are right.
    There were three different statuses

    training crew - not taking part in operations
    nursery crew
    fully operational crew

    So I would say it is something like a "freshman" crew for some period after finisheing an training at the squadron at the time.
    I have checked few such a crews and their captains were mostly pilots who made few operations with the squadron as second dickies berfore being promoted to captains.
    Maybe someone else woud be able to confirm/disconfirm/correct my thoughts.

    HTH

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    I agree with Pavel. I've seen the term used quite a few times in various Bomber Command ORB's, and in all cases it is applied to a relatively newly operational Pilot or crew.

    I've just found a reference to it on my own website! It was in a tale recounted by ex 102 Squadron Wireless Operator Ed Cooke. This is what he said.
    "When we converted to Halifaxes we were given strict instructions that should we land away from base we were not to let anyone into the aircraft because Gee and other new equipment onboard were on the secret list. For the last trip of my tour, some 'kind' person elected to send me on a nursery with a new crew. Usually this was to the channel ports, but at briefing it was found that it was to Vichy with a load of 'bum fodder', leaflets to you, what a waste as I'm sure bombs would have got their attention a lot better, but maybe the leaflets being shiny was a new weapon as the paper was glossy, anyway, there were three of us scheduled to go."


    So in addition to it referring to a relatively new Pilot or crew, it also suggests here that the operation involved was one of the 'easier' ones although I have to say I don't like to use the word 'easy' in relation to any Bomber Command operation as I'm sure they were all far from that.

    Regards
    Linzee
    Last edited by Linzee; 18th March 2018 at 15:08.

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    Thank you both. Very helpful.

    Mikkel
    Britain's Victory, Denmark's Freedom. Danish Volunteers in Allied Air Forces During the Second World War
    fb.me/britainsvictorydenmarksfreedom
    danishww2pilots.dk - a resource on Danish aircrew during the Second World War

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