Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: 83 Sqn Manchester L7426 lost March 9, 1942

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default 83 Sqn Manchester L7426 lost March 9, 1942

    Hi All,

    Well after a long absence, lost in the trenches of 1914-1918, I have returned to 1939-1945 and have a query about this a/c for a friend.

    It was shot down 4km NE of Enkhuisen, map reference Z.3762. The report says it crashed into the Ijsselmer and the nose broke through the ice. The Germans tried to rescue the crew but were unsuccessful.

    The only crew member I have details on is P/O William Arthur Harris J/5082, RCAF.

    The relative who has Harris's service file, provided the following account from it: "A further visit was made to Ehkhuizen on 5th September (1946) and Wachtmeester H. Grashuis contacted. This aircraft crashed in flames on the night of 9th March, 1942, according to this eyewitness. The aircraft is reported to have nosed its way through thick ice and the fuselage sank through the gush made by the nose. The aircraft wings lay resting on the ice with the nose above the ice when the Germans attempted to recover members of the crew."

    Can anyone tell me the other crew member names and perhaps an entry from the ORB?

    thanks... and it's nice to be back again.
    David

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,011
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Welcome back, we left a light burning ...
    http://www.filephotoservice.co.uk/
    RESEARCH AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES & OTHER UK INSTITUTIONS

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    LOL, thanks Bruce.

    I have obviously forgotten my SOP though... did a simple web search and found the crew of "OL-D", which was going/returning from a mission to Essen. So now just looking for extra details from ORB or similar.

    Pilot:P/O 114266 Christopher Ronald Frost DFM 25 RAFVR killed.
    Pilot:P/O 61282 Ian Frederick Livingstone 25 RAFVR killed.
    P/O J/5082 William Arthur Harris 24 RCAF killed.
    Flt/Sgt 901690 William Durham Biltcliffe 22 RAFVR killed.
    Sgt 1326330 Stanley Grunwell 27 RAFVR killed.
    Sgt 1376053 Harold Reginald Ray RAFVR killed.
    Wop/AG:Sgt 931488 Joseph Howard Stone RAFVR killed.
    David

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Cornwall
    Posts
    1,765
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    [QUOTE=dfuller52;116163]LOL, thanks Bruce.

    I have obviously forgotten my SOP though... did a simple web search and found the crew of "OL-D", which was going/returning from a mission to Essen. So now just looking for extra details from ORB or similar.

    What is it you would like from the ORB, unfortunately, on checking, the loss is not recorded in the 541 of the ORB
    Last edited by AlanW; 4th February 2016 at 19:56.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    East Sussex
    Posts
    526
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    The 83 Squadron history by Low and Harper ISBN 1 900604 05 1 gives the details as (there are some typos in the book)

    8/3/42
    Manchester
    L7426
    "D"
    PO I F Livingstone

    PO C R Frost DFM
    Sgt J Stone
    PO WA Harris
    FS W Biltcliffe
    Sgt S Crunwell
    Sgt H Ray

    All killed
    Crashed 3km from Enkhuisen Ijsselmeer Holland
    Eight aircraft to attack Krupps factories at Essen. First GEE operation. A total of 22 Manchesters operated and 3 lost two. (R5779) The only two Manchester losses.

    L7426 was piloted by PO CR Frost DFM. He had completed his first tour with 61 Squadron and was flying his second with 83 Squadron. He was one of those pilots who mistrusted the Manchester having lost most of his best friends flying them.
    The loss was vividly recalled by a Dutchman, MJ Altens, who on that night was a policeman on duty at the railway at Enkhuigen.
    "Over the Usselmeer, I observed a small light which appeared to be heading in a westerly direction. It quickly became obvious that the light was caused by flames - a plane was on fire up there! I watched with horrified fascination as the drama unfolded. The aircraft was flying at a great height when it went up in flames and fell like a stone. For a moment I thought it might crash on Enkhuigen but it seemed to be further away. The aircraft came down about three kilometers east-north-east of Enkhuigen and was smashed on the ice of the frozen Usselmeer; which at the time was eighty centimeters thick. The heavy engines went straight through the ice, while the fuselage scattered over hundreds of metres."

    The crashed machine was the Manchester L7426 of Pilot Officer Frost, a man who had flown many missions and who now met his end along with his entire crew before the guns of Oberleutnant Becker. O

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    East Sussex
    Posts
    526
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Sorry, sent it by mistake….
    Low & Harper continued:
    Only the bodies of Frost and the Wireless Operator/Gunner, Sgt Stone, were found. They were buried in Bergen. It is possible that Frost was attempting to get the stricken plane back over solid ground to allow the crew to bale out. The idea is further supported by the fact that the bodies were strapped into their parachutes.

    Hope this helps.
    James

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    1,231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Excellent, thanks James. And Alan, thanks for checking. This will fill the bill nicely.
    David

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •