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Thread: Kempston or Kimpton RNZAF - following up archived thread

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    Default Kempston or Kimpton RNZAF - following up archived thread

    There is an archived thread for which the last post seems to be 2005.
    It seeks a Hugh Kempston (RNZAF) but it appears that the name was actually Kimpton.
    I recall an ex RNZAF man Hugh Kimpton, living in Palmerston North in the 1950s. He was active I think in Brevet Club affairs.
    His wife was British and they had 3 children.
    I don't know his post war occupation, but there is a record that Hugh died in '06.
    Last edited by Jagan; 13th February 2016 at 23:23.

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    Dellerboy,
    This was NZ401391 Hugh Colin Kimpton, sailed from NZ as a fully-trained Sergeant pilot (Course No. 2A, 1 FTS Wigram, graduated 19/12/40) for UK 6 January 1941 per EMPRESS OF RUSSIA. He was commissioned as from 7 July 1942. Errol will probably be on a little later with further information.
    David D
    Last edited by David Duxbury; 14th February 2016 at 02:05. Reason: Additional info

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    Thanks.
    Do you know if the Kimpton family have a recollection of the bailout incident as told by Hugh?

    Quote Originally Posted by David Duxbury View Post
    Dellerboy,
    This was NZ401391 Hugh Colin Kimpton, sailed from NZ as a fully-trained Sergeant pilot (Course No. 2A, 1 FTS Wigram, graduated 19/12/40) for UK 6 January 1941 per EMPRESS OF RUSSIA. He was commissioned as from 7 July 1942. Errol will probably be on a little later with further information.
    David D

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    In the 1981 electoral rolls Kimpton is listed as a company directory residing at Feilding.

    His bale out was from 1655 Mosquito Training Unit Mosquito XX KB269 on the night of 13/14 Aug 44 following loss of control at 25,000 feet.The crew were injured but it is believed not seriously.

    You can establish his exact date of death through NZ Births Deaths and Marriages online. From this you should be able to locate a death notice in the local (or Palmerston North?) paper which in turn may provide you with next of kin.

    Errol

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    Thanks Errol
    Hugh's crewmember's family recollection which is posted on these threads somewhere, suggests that Hugh bailed out first when he should have waited until the crewmember had exited the aircraft.
    I was really looking for something from the Kimpton side.
    I recall as a youngster meeting Hugh on several occasions and a more unflappable type would be hard to find.
    Dellerboy

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    F/O Watkins' account of the incident is given here but does not stand up to scrutiny, in my opinion.

    https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=151177

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    Quote Originally Posted by angelsonefive View Post
    F/O Watkins' account of the incident is given here but does not stand up to scrutiny, in my opinion.

    https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/wiki.php?id=151177

    I agree. Wouldn't be the first time that suspect material has been posted on that site either.

    Errol

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    could it be that Fg Offr Watkins was involved in two different bale outs?

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    So far as I can tell, the only way to bale out of a Mosquito is through the (jettisonable) entry/exit door, which is located on the starboard side of the cockpit - the pilot sits on the port side. The jettisonable roof hatch was considered to be unsuitable for anything but abandonment of aircraft on the ground, usually after a wheels up landing or collapsed undercarriage. This was true for all fighter bomber, night fighter and trainer versions. The bomber and PR Mosquitos (including the B.XX which featured in the accident) had the entry door under the forward fuselage, pretty much under the feet of the second crew member sitting in the starboard seat. This hatch also seems to have provided the floor in flight for access to the nose compartment, not a feature of the other types mentioned above. However in both instances it seems that the second man (usually in trade of Navigator [Wireless]) seemed to be in the best position to bale out first - otherwise he would tend to cramp access to the door, although this was a much more serious problem with the side-mounted door. I remember reading an account in a magazine many years ago about two men attempting to bale out of a converted Mosquito in the USA in the late 1950s or early 60s (in flight engine fire I think), and it was claimed that they used the roof hatch, but as pointed out, this practise was forcibly warned against in the pilot's notes (no doubt the aerials and tail surfaces would have presented serious hazards to life and limb.) Murder of one of the men also featured, as well as other crimes, so it presented a very muddy picture. Can anybody recall this incident?
    David D
    Last edited by David Duxbury; 20th February 2016 at 01:53.

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Duxbury View Post
    So far as I can tell, the only way to bale out of a Mosquito is through the (jettisonable) entry/exit door, which is located on the starboard side of the cockpit - the pilot sits on the port side. The jettisonable roof hatch was considered to be unsuitable for anything but abandonment of aircraft on the ground, usually after a wheels up landing or collapsed undercarriage. This was true for all fighter bomber, night fighter and trainer versions. The bomber and PR Mosquitos (including the B.XX which featured in the accident) had the entry door under the forward fuselage, pretty much under the feet of the second crew member sitting in the starboard seat. This hatch also seems to have provided the floor in flight for access to the nose compartment, not a feature of the other types mentioned above. However in both instances it seems that the second man (usually in trade of Navigator [Wireless]) seemed to be in the best position to bale out first - otherwise he would tend to cramp access to the door, although this was a much more serious problem with the side-mounted door. I remember reading an account in a magazine many years ago about two men attempting to bale out of a converted Mosquito in the USA in the late 1950s or early 60s (in flight engine fire I think), and it was claimed that they used the roof hatch, but as pointed out, this practise was forcibly warned against in the pilot's notes (no doubt the aerials and tail surfaces would have presented serious hazards to life and limb.) Murder of one of the men also featured, as well as other crimes, so it presented a very muddy picture. Can anybody recall this incident?
    David D
    What part of Watkins' account doesn't ring true?
    My impression of the configuration of the pilot and crew positions is that the crew member (navigator) would hardly be unaware that the pilot was baling out. The idea that the first he knew about it was when he received no response to his voice message seems odd.
    Given that they were rapidly running out of altitude in an uncontrollable aircraft why would the navigator insist on calculating a course?

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