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Thread: Flight Engineer training WWII

  1. #11
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    Thanks, Malcolm.

    Hans

  2. #12
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    Pete:

    The first intake of flight engineers for Coastal Command took place on 4th June 1943 at No 4 School of Tech Training, RAF St Athan. The first two airmen to qualify did so on 16 August 1943. Sgt F W J 'Ted' Hedges, a friend of mine for 15 years who sadly recently passed away, was one of them. Ted went on to Fortresses with 220 Sqn at Benbecula and The Azores and at the tender age of 21 was instructing flight engineers on Fortresses and Liberators with 1674 HCU at Aldergrove.

    Details in the document I forwarded earlier.

    Robert

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    In relation to Flight Engineers, I have seen examples of small leather 'Air Ministry' embossed cases which have been referred to as F/E Tool Boxes. Has anyone seen of of these in a complete state to advise further, they appear rather small so any content would have been minimal.
    Thank you to the contributors of these questions thus far.

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    G'day Chaps

    The following is a small part of a segment on Flight Engineer training in Canada. It is taken from a book Hugh Halliday and myself are writing on the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan in Canada.

    Cheers...Chris

    RCAF Flight Engineers School - Aylmer, Ontario

    Brief Chronology
    Initially, partial flight engineer training had been conducted at No. 1 Technical Training School at St. Thomas, Ontario and No. 1 Flight Engineer School at Arnprior, Ontario. This was followed by a seven week course at R.A.F. Station St. Athan, Glamorgan, Wales. That was about to change with the formation the R.C.A.F. Flight Engineer School at Aylmer, Ontario on 1 July, 1944. Initially, school personnel were attached to No. 14 S.F.T.S. for rations and quarters, discipline and pay. By the time that No. 14 S.F.T.S. finished its move to Kingston, Ontario, all flight engineering training would be centered at Aylmer except for Elementary General Technical training at No. 1 Technical Training School at St. Thomas, Ontario.

    The seven week type training course initially focused on the Handley Page Halifax bomber. The first of its type arrived in Canada from the U.K. on 14 June. The fourth and last arrived on 31 June.

    At the beginning of February, 1944, S/L G. A. Adams came to Canada from the R.A.F. Flight Engineer School at R.A.F. Station St. Athan. He served as the R.A.F. Liaison Officer on Flight Engineer training in Canada until he assumed command of the school on 1 July. Adams was also took on the added responsibilities of Chief Instructor. Thirteen very experienced R.A.F. N.C.O. instructors were taken on strength the same day.

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    Hello,

    The following on RAAF Ground Staff in the UK selected for Flight Engineer training, might be of interest:

    http://naa12.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetri...aspx?B=4569804

    See: pp.5-7 of 72

    Not a healthy profession. 10 of 15 members mentioned lost their lives.

    Col.

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    Just a quick update on this one:

    AMO 190/1941 set out the training for the Fitter I, Fitter II, Fitter II (Engine) and Fitter (Aero-Engine) that were nominated for Flight Engineer training. It states:

    Airmen will be required to undergo courses as follows:

    (i) A three weeks' course of air gunnery at a bombing and gunnery school, followed by
    (ii) Short courses of training at manufacturers' works.

    On satisfactory completion of these courses, operational training will be undertaken.

    It is known that due to a shortage of air gunner training places, the air gunnery component was subsequently limited to Coastal Command / GR Squadron personnel.

    One of the original No 35 Squadron F/E has advised that he was posted to the squadron after his air gunnery training and learned his trade "on the job" by participating in training flights whenever he could. He was sent to Handley Page for type training (Halifax airframe and hydraulics) and to Rolls Royce for type training (Halifax engines).

    Regards

    Pete
    Last edited by PeteT; 5th April 2016 at 13:16.
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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    Default Re: Flight Engineer training WWII

    Hi Chris,
    I know this is years after your entry... however, I'm editing the papers of F/L Harold Whipp, RCAF Squadron 409, who mentions his brother in law training in Arnprior in 1943. He later became a flight engineer. Other than this reference, I can't find any mention of #1 Flight Engineer School being in Arnprior. Can you provide a reference for me to use in order to cite Arnprior? Much obliged!

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Flight Engineer training WWII

    Hello,

    Chris said Aylmer, not Arnprior.

    http://www.bcatp.org/086-no-1-flight...aylmer-ontario

    Regards,

    Dave

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Flight Engineer training WWII

    Thanks Dave,


    I am aware of the Aylmer school -- But the post I'm referencing was:

    Brief Chronology
    Initially, partial flight engineer training had been conducted at No. 1 Technical Training School at St. Thomas, Ontario and No. 1 Flight Engineer School at Arnprior, Ontario. This was followed by a seven week course at R.A.F. Station St. Athan, Glamorgan, Wales. That was about to change with the formation the R.C.A.F. Flight Engineer School at Aylmer, Ontario on 1 July, 1944.

    Initially, school personnel were attached to No. 14 S.F.T.S. for rations and quarters, discipline and pay. By the time that No. 14 S.F.T.S. finished its move to Kingston, Ontario, all flight engineering training would be centered at Aylmer except for Elementary General Technical training at No. 1 Technical Training School at St. Thomas, Ontario.

    His reference to No. 1 Flight Engineer School at Arnprior, Ontario. was the tantalizing detail I was hoping to get more info on...if anyone does know anthing that might shed light on why a Flight Engineer would be training in Arnprior, I'd be obliged. (The other option is that my epistolary mention was in error and meant Aylmer...)

    cheers
    Leslie

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