Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: explanation of Lancaster parts

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default explanation of Lancaster parts

    Hi,

    I am trying to understand the meaning of some Lancaster parts in order to translate it in German. So it is a mixture of not understanding the english words for them and the function. The names of the parts come from the AP of a Lanc I. It would be nice if somebody could explain or describe them for me a bit, thanks.

    1. extractor louver (cabin heating)

    2. BBP plate; it is at the front edge of the wing between inner engine and fuselage; another part is a B.B. cable cutter, in this case it is a barrage balloon cutter, but I do not know if these have something to do with each other

    3. flame damper - Is it for not showing the fire of the engine in the night or is it something for emergencies? It is at the outside of the engine.

    4. aileron balance tab/elevator balance tab - I wonder what tab is in this case ...

    5. Dip-Stick Stowage

    6. sea markers and flame floats

    7. flap jack cover

    8. control locking gear stowage

    Thanks for your help.

    Best.

    Marcel

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Canada, eh
    Posts
    1,217
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    1. Outlet for heated air, "Louver" means the outlet is rectangular (like a letter slot), or covered with a grill that creates a series of rectangular outlets. (Auspuff, of a particular shape)

    2. Not sure, but probably reinforcements that form part of the barrage balloon cutter installation.

    3. Covers visible flame from engine exhaust at night. Some mix ambient air into the exhaust, to cool it, some just keep the exhaust covered over longer, until the flame consumes itself. Depending on where it is, it could be intended to prevent detection fo the aircraft at night, or it could be intended to prevent the crew from loosing their night vision.

    4. Balance tabs reduce the pilot effort to move the control surface. They often are geared to move when the pilot moves a control stick. Sort of like a servo tab, but not intended to be the main source of movement of the surface, just there to reduce pilot effort.

    5. Dip stick is used to measure depth of a fluid in a container (fuel, oil, etc.) Usually a wooden slat or rod, with markings corresponding to liquid quantity ("quarter full" or "4 quarts", etc.) "Stowage" is where you put the dipstick when not in use.

    6. Sea markers release chemical dye into water, creating a large visible spot used in navigation, or to draw attention of other aircraft to a particular spot in the water (for rescues, for example). Flame floats are flares that ignite and remain on the surface of the water, performing the same function as sea markers, but at night.

    7. "jack" would today be called "hydraulic actuator" or "hydraulic cylinder". The cover is probably to ensure that nothing floating about in the cabin becomes jammed against the actuator, preventing it from moving normally.

    8. Control locks are fitted when the aircraft is shut down, to prevent winds from moving and damaging the control surfaces. They can lock the surfaces themselves, or they can lock the cockpit controls from moving. Again, "stowage" is where you put them when not in use. The aircraft would always carry its own locking gear, in case of a landing away from base. Today, this stuff would have big red "remove before flight" tags on it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi Bill,

    great, that is what I hoped to get, thanks.

    Concerning no 2, the cutters where at the end of the wing, so I still wonder how it could be of help if the cable is not cut at the place where this BBP plate is ...

    Thanks again, very nice of you.

    Cheers.

    Marcel

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,011
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Hello Marcel,
    Here is a link to a picture of a cutter ...

    http://s92.photobucket.com/user/chri...N1428.jpg.html


    By the way, can I ask where did you get the information that the plate was named BBP?
    Hope this helps,
    Bruce
    http://www.filephotoservice.co.uk/
    RESEARCH AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES & OTHER UK INSTITUTIONS

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi again,

    nice picture, thanks.

    BBP is shown in the drawing of a Lanc I in the book "The Lancaster manual".

    Marcel

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    231
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi,

    now I have seen that such a plate is also beside the cutter.

    Marcel

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •