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Thread: Zenon Kozlowski, RAF No. 706483 (moved)

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    Default Zenon Kozlowski, RAF No. 706483 (moved)

    I am new to this particular forum, but have done family history for nearly 50 years. I was recommended to come here by a gentleman I met at the TNA.

    I am researching the ancestry of a lady now living in Sweden, whose father was involved in the training of Polish air crews at RAF Newton in W.W.II. His name was Zenon Kozlowski, RAF No. 706483, born at Warsaw in 1920. I believe he died abroad in Spain in 1985. However his widow is still alive, but by now in her late 80s. Consequently I will not be able to generate the necessary paperwork to access his full RAF service record until my contact in Sweden and her two brothers visit with their mother, which will be in June/July time. Her belief is that Zenon Kozlowski escaped through Zakopane in the very south of Poland, over the Carpathian mountains into Bulgaria, and made his way to Palestine where he joined General Sikorsky. The family story is that he was part of the Polish forces sent into Tobruk early in 1942. Consequently he was quite late in joining the RAF, and never took part in active operations.

    So I just wondered if this Forum could say anything useful, just based on these few snippets of information, and especially any educated guess when this RAF Number may have been assigned. I have looked at the Airbase Record for RAF Newton at the TNA in Class AIR 29/621, but I could not find his name immediately. This was home to No. 16 (Polish) Special Flying Training School from July 1941. Of course, I guess he could have been injured in field operations in the Polish Battalion abroad, and really just fulfilled a part in the administrative structure at RAF Newton.

    Also I have yet to visit the Sikorski Museum in London, close to the Royal Albert Hall, and their historic collections which contain much useful information on Sikorski and Poland both during and immediately after W.W.II. Clearly there should be a pretty interesting story to unfold here if we can break into it. Also I have yet to discover if the family ever claimed the W.W.II medals. He was a flight sergeant in 1947, but by 1950 had left the RAF and was living at Brighton.

    Thanks in advance

    Brian P. Swann

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    Hello Brian, welcome to the forum. I have moved your post to it's own thread in the general Forum where it will get more views. Good luck with Kozlowski, his story sounds like it is interesting.
    Regards,
    Bruce
    http://www.filephotoservice.co.uk/
    RESEARCH AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES & OTHER UK INSTITUTIONS

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    Hello Brian,

    There was a man named F/Sgt Zenon Teodor Kozlowski Service No P-706483 born 21st April 1920 recorded as a pilot. Is this him?

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    Quote Originally Posted by archivist View Post
    Hello Brian,

    There was a man named F/Sgt Zenon Teodor Kozlowski Service No P-706483 born 21st April 1920 recorded as a pilot. Is this him?
    Yes that matches exactly the information Brian posted.

    Bruce
    http://www.filephotoservice.co.uk/
    RESEARCH AT THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES & OTHER UK INSTITUTIONS

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    Brian,
    As far as I know, Zenon Kozlowski was registered as a volunteer to Polish Air Force on 21.07.1943 and then received his service number 706483.

    Greg

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    Brian,

    Since Kozlowski died more than 25 years ago you can access his service record in your own right although you will need a copy of his death certificate. Details are at https://www.gov.uk/requests-for-pers...sonnel-records. The document will provide details of the units with which he served - provided he actually served in the RAF - as opposed to with the RAF. However, as he was a Polish national it is more probable his military records are held by a separate Polish organisation at RAF Northolt (for details see http://www.polandinexile.com/addresses.html).

    Another Brian

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    Hello Brian,

    I hope that your query was not just a "fly by" question and I am sure you WILL get an answer here. But I hope you are receptive to corrections! The "Special" FTS is actually the "Service" FTS. Give us a little bit more and we might just give you a lot more!

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    Dear All

    Thank you for this useful information. I am sorry it has taken me a little time to reply, but from next Wednesday I will be up at Who Do You Think You Are in the DNA Area there, as I am the Regional Co-ordinator for ISOGG (International Society of Genetic Genealogy). So I have been very heavily involved in generating handouts and flyers for the great British public.

    We use DNA testing to sort out family history. It may be of passing interest to this forum to know that I have heard the Chief Scientist in the US Military involved with identification of recovered remains of US Army, Navy and Air Force Personnel speak at a meeting on Ancient DNA organised by the Royal Society in December 2013. There is no real equivalent to that in the UK - a simple case of funding. The only recent parallel where a major effort has been made to identify remains of British personnel from W.W.I. was the recovery dig at Fromelles. The US makes extensive use of autosomal and mitochondrial DNA testing of relatives to generate the necessary DNA fingerprints of living relatives, which is essential in this type of work. Some of the best genealogists in the USA give their time and expertise to assist in this type of work. Food for thought here for this forum.

    Apologies for Service vs Special - there is a lovely small file at the TNA, which is the discussion between the Air Ministry Administration Branch and the Chester Herald at the College of Arms of how the crest for the logo for the RAF Newton station was generated. The finalised B&W design was signed off by King George VI in 1945, I assume personally.

    We have yet to apply to the organisation in Poland that has Zenon Teodor Kozlowski's birth certificate, although the family has a short abbreviated version of it issued in 1966. This was at the height of the Cold War, of course, and I can only speculate that it was to do with being able to claim a state pension for himself. At that time he would have 3 children to support with the eldest due to go off to university in 1967. So my guess was that money was tight and every penny counted. I have only been able to have a certain amount of discussion about his life with his eldest daughter. I just get the feeling either she does not know any more, as her father kept stuff close to his chest, or he may have been scarred mentally with what he experienced between 1939 and 1943, before he joined the RAF.

    If you are interested, I will tell more as and when we get our hands on his RAF file. This has forced me to learn a lot more about both the role of the Polish Air Squadrons and their training in W.W.II and the history of Poland immediately after W.W.I, which is also equally fascinating. Few people know that a young De Gaulle went as part of a delegation mission to Warsaw between July and August 1920 to help the Polish Army attempt to defeat the new Bolshevik Red Army, threatening to march across Poland and on into Germany, spreading chaos and mayhem to an already turbulent Europe and instilling and installing Lenin's ideas of a glorious Soviet worker's revolution. Fortunately for the future of Poland their Chief of the Army, General Pulzidski, studiously ignored the advice given by General Weygand and the Franco-British mission organised by Lloyd-George as a panic measure, and managed to defeat the Russian forces at the gates of Warsaw, a battle known as "The Miracle of the Vistula". The Russian commander was also not helped by the disloyalty of certain Russian units in the south of Poland on the Ukraine frontier, acting under the commands of a political commisar, one Josef Stalin.

    Brian

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