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Thread: 22-06-36 S1562 Blackburn Baffin crash into SS Normandie Images

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    Default 22-06-36 S1562 Blackburn Baffin crash into SS Normandie Images

    I was alerted to these



    http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/t...8585/page-3737

    Then found this


    http://i25.servimg.com/u/f25/12/55/11/33/quizza10.jpg

    22-06-36 S1562 Blackburn Baffin flew into rigging on SS Normandie in Ryde Roads

    For reference

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SS_Normandie#Career


    On 22 June 1936, Blackburn Baffin S5162 of A Flight, RAF Gosport buzzed Normandie a mile (2 km) off Ryde Pier and collided with a derrick which was transferring a motor car belonging to Arthur Evans, MP, onto a barge alongside the ship. The aircraft crashed onto Normandie's stern. The pilot was taken off by tender, but the wreckage of the aircraft remained on board Normandie as she had to sail due to the tide. It was carried to Le Havre, France. A salvage team from the Royal Air Force later removed the wreckage. The pilot was Court-martialled and found guilty on two charges. Evans' car was wrecked in the accident, which was brought up in Parliament


    Paul

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    Paul,

    "On June 22 1936, five Blackburn Baffin torpedo bombers of 'A' (Torpedo Trianing} Fliight of the RAF Base at Gosport were practising in formation over the Solent when the leader decided they should circle around the French Liner S.S. 'Normandie', then anchored about a mile off Ryde Pier on the Isle of Wight. The ship, which had just crossed the Atlantic, was in the process of disembarking passengers from the United States. Unfortunately one of the aircraft, S1562, which bore the identification number '8', approached too close and its port wing struck a fore-mast stay of the ship, and promptly dropped squarely on to the fore-deck, which fortunately happened to be unobstructured at that time. As there was no lifting gear aboard the ship, which could not be delayed, it sailed on to Le Havre with the aircraft still on deck. The Baffin was reported at the time not to very badly damaged, but there is no evidence of it having had subsequent service. The pilot of the aircraft was Flying Officer G. K. Horsey (who also held the naval ranking of Lieutenant), who was unhurt.

    Contemporary reports suggest that he was the sole occupant."

    Answer suppiled by Ray Sturtivant.

    Any Questions?
    Wingspan No.87 (May, 1992). p.51

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 7th June 2016 at 22:14. Reason: Had Horsey originally, put in Hornsey. Ta Paul.

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    Col

    Thanks no questions but

    Guy Kennedy HORSEY

    Note spelling gets loads of hits on Google

    http://www.oldclassiccar.co.uk/forum...40b050d2db917b


    Paul

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    Guy Kennedy Horsey is featured in contemporary press reports about the incident, as well as another three years previously.

    This, from the Aberdeen Journal, August 28th 1938:

    'The court finds the accused, Flying Officer Guy Kennedy Horsey, Lieut. R.N. guilty on all charges, and sentences him to take rank and precedence as if his appointment as flying officer bore date July 21 1936, and to be severely reprimanded. The sentence was duly confirmed and promulgated on August 24, 1936.'

    He was also involved in an accident on June 2nd 1935, in which two young motor cyclists were killed when in collision with a car driven by Guy Kennedy Horsey. The Dundee Courier of September 19th 1935 reports:

    '[Sub-Lieut] Guy Kennedy Horsey [of R.A.F. Training Base, Leuchars]...was charged with having, on June 2, on the Milnathort-Cupar Road, while under the influence of drink, driven a motor car recklessly and at speed and in a manner which was dangerous to the public.
    Accused pleaded guilty, and Sheriff Umpherson imposed a fine of 10, with the alternative of 30 days' imprisonment.'


    Fined 10 - absolutely unbelieveable, really. Different times, I suppose, but beggars belief all the same.

    The two dead youths were aged 18 and 17, and members of the Sauchie Parish Church Boys' Brigade on their way back from a weekend camp at St Andrews, as reported in the Dundee Courier on June 4th 1935.

    Regards

    Simon

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