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Thread: WW2 RAF Pilot Medical Records

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    Default WW2 RAF Pilot Medical Records

    Greetings!

    I wonder if someone out there can help. I wish to find my father's WW2 RAF medical records. Do they still exist? And if so, how would I go about sourcing them?

    My father, Flt. Lt. Jack Hubert Stigner 89334 RAFVR, suffered from burst ear drums after being hit by flak while serving with 53 Squadron, but still continued to fly (which I gather is unusual). Later in the war, he was involved in an air accident in Scotland (while serving with 132 OTU at East Fortune), and I know received severe scaring to his forehead at that time. I am interested in what the RAF medical bods thought about his injuries...

    Thanks in advance.

    Jonathan

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    Jonathan, Hi,
    Medical Records – of one sort or another – exist(ed). You may have some great difficulty in extracting them. They were fairly sacrosanct long before FOI and Personal Data Protection became by-words for avoiding the truth. It depended on what they were for.
    In my own case, my pre-National Service medical lasted some 5 minutes in the Govt Buildings at Cambridge. It was designed to prove that I was fit for National Service, and that I could not claim exemption for some spurious medical reason.
    Similarly, my ‘demob’ medical took place in a Seco hut at Blackbushe in the small hours of a morning, and was designed to prove that the RAF had not, medically, ruined me to the extent that I could sue the Air Ministry.
    All I’m trying to say is that IF you manage to extract the Medical Records just bear in mind what they were designed to prove/disprove! Be cynical!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Thanks, Peter.
    I get the idea. Especially knowing that my Dad did have medical issues, but that the Medical Records section on his service record (A. M. form 1406) is completely blank!
    I would still like to know how to find/extract whatever medical records that might be hidden away somewhere.
    Best regards,
    Jonathan

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    Hi Jonathan,

    I sourced my late grandfather's medical records two years ago, although he was British army, they are still classified as 'restricted'.

    I was informed that due to 'Access to health records act 1990' under the act the common law duty of confidentialilty applies,
    there is no automatic right of access.

    However (maybe because he passed away 24 years ago?) 'the sessional medical advisor reviewed his file and agreed to release some documents'. The whole file was copied to me and I found my grandfather returned from the Far East in 1945 due to a mental breakdown - which was totally unknown to the surviving members of the family... It was to be honest quite sad, the poor sod obviously never mentioned it to anyone and post war got on with his life as many did. So be prepared for the unexpected. The records came from the same location as his main service record (Army Personnel Centre, Glasgow), although I got the impression the medical records are separated. So it's a good idea to contact RAF Cranwell and ask.
    Last edited by GlennB; 20th September 2016 at 19:23.

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