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Thread: D.F. indicator

  1. #11
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    Thanks Richard.

    Marcel

  2. #12
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    Hello Chaps,
    on my page here, you will see Jacobson's log book, trade being WOM but on flying duty. On the 4 (C) OTU page he records W/T excercize M/F D.F ? H/F

    What way would one read that line, was he practicing medium freq. Direction finding and High Freq. 'other' transmissions.

    Or would it be M/F D/F AND H/F D/F

    http://www.ww2irishaviation.com/w3977.htm

    Cheers

  3. #13
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    99% sure it's '&' ('and'), Dennis.

    Brian

  4. #14
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    Yes, of course, it matches the last entry, W/T and gunnery. I didn't cotton on that.

    Other question remains, was he therefore doing:

    M/F D/F & H/F

    or

    M/F D/F & H/F D/F

    What might H/F exercise be if not D/F?
    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

  5. #15
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    Dennis,
    The difference between M/F and H/F is simply that of the radio frequency(ies) used to navigate (in addition to a lot of other things!). At the beginning of WW2 frequency determination was an art-form (don’t listen to those who try to tell you otherwise!). By the end of WW2 it was becoming a science! Positioning by H/F (or M/F) D/F was a scientific art-form! It was overtaken by airborne radar, which produced a ‘map’ of the ground under the a/c. That, in its turn has been replaced by the various GPS systems (although a nasty burst of solar flares can ‘bend’ them?). Even today I “fly” all over the world on my flight simulator navigating by using the very same techniques that they used in WW2. My beacons are now VHF VORs, and H/F NDBs (all hidden in my computer!!) – but it’s the same principle!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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