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Thread: Cat & Mouse Ground Stations

  1. #1
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    Default Cat & Mouse Ground Stations

    Hi,

    Just trying to determine why the GH ground stations were called "Cat" and "Mouse". Can anyone explain please.

    Thanks

    Steve
    No.218 (Gold Coast) Squadron Association Historian
    No.623 squadron Research

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    Mojmir,

    Thanks for that, however I interested to learn why, Cat & Mouse, and not Dog & Cat ???

    Regards

    Steve
    No.218 (Gold Coast) Squadron Association Historian
    No.623 squadron Research

    ~~IN TIME ~~

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    Steve - according to "Beam Bombers - The Secret War of No.109 Squadron" by Michael Cumming, the term "mouse" came first and referred to a specific piece of a equipment that was used for measuring the ground speed of Oboe Mosquitos. One of the prime functions of an Oboe ground station that was acting as a "releasing station" was to measure the speed of the Mosquito as it went down the Oboe beam and they would send a signal in Morse code to the navigator at 10, 8, 6 and 3 minutes to the release point and the final 5 second audible count down to release. The releasing station code became known as the "mouse" and the "tracking station" which projected the 17 yard wide Oboe beam over the target, became known as the "Cat". Operational orders issued to the Oboe ground stations used the code words "Cat" & "Mouse" to designate the particular function of each ground station involved in an individual Oboe attack. All Oboe ground stations could act either as the "Cat" or the "Mouse" for any attack. The two ground stations were in contact with each other by secure telephone line during the Oboe run, with WAAFs plotting the aircraft as it went down the beam. The run was presided over by a controller who would assess the accuracy of the run as it was unfolding and would key off the crew if they were going to be more than 200 yards off the designated release point and call in a reserve aircraft.
    Last edited by David Wallace; 30th October 2016 at 23:26.

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