Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: frederick foster wright j93453

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default frederick foster wright j93453

    Frederick foster wright is my grandfather and im just trying to find more info about the night of march 8th 1945 as ive been doing a lot of searching on my grandfather trying to gather info to add to everything I have of him would be greatly appreciated thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    743
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Presume you have seen this old archived thread.
    http://www.rafcommands.com/archive/10273.php

    Also
    From 'Bomber Command War Diaries' - Martin Middlebrook and Chris Everitt

    8/9 March 1945

    312 aircraft - 241 Halifaxes, 62 Lancasters, 9 Mosquitos - of Nos 4, 6 and 8 Groups attacked Hamburg. 1 Halifax lost. The purpose of this raid was to hit the shipyards which were now assembling the new Type XXI U-boats, whose parts were prefabricated in many parts of inland Germany. Thanks to the Schnorkel breathing tube and a new type of battery-driven electric engine, the Type XXI could cruise under water for long periods and was capable of bursts of high speed. Its development in numbers would have posed great problems for Allied convoy defence if the war had lasted longer. The Hamburg area was found to be cloud-covered and the bombing was not expected to be accurate enough to cause much damage to the shipyards.

    262 Lancasters and 14 Mosquitos of Nos 1 and 8 Groups carried out the first large raid on Kassel since October 1943; it was also the last large RAF raid on this target. 1 Mosquito lost. This target was also covered by cloud. The only local report available is a short one which says that many fires were started in the western parts of Kassel. No casualties or other details are given.

    39 Mosquitos to Berlin, 33 to Hannover, 7 to Hagen and 5 each to Bremen and Osnabrück, 50 RCM sorties, 36 Mosquito patrols, 23 Halifaxes and 14 Lancasters minelaying in the Rivers Elbe and Weser, 5 aircraft on Resistance operations. 1 RCM Halifax lost. The 5 Stirlings of No 161 Squadron, which were carrying supplies to Resistance units at unrecorded destinations, but probably in Denmark and Norway, were the last Resistance operations flights of the war.

    Total effort for the night: 805 sorties, 3 aircraft (0.4 per cent) lost.

    Martyn

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    163
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Here's a link to some info you will be interested in:
    http://rcafassociation.ca/awards.php
    ============================
    This is what it says when you go to the link:
    WRIGHT, F/O Frederick Foster (J93453) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.100 Squadron - Award effective 24 April 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. Home in Peterborough, Ontario; enlisted in Toronto, 23 June 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 5 November 1942), No.10 EFTS (graduated 17 May 1943) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 11 August 1943). Invested with award by King George, 13 July 1945. RCAF photo PL-46399 (ex UK-23868 dated 27 December 1945) is captioned as follows: “Following completion of a tour of operations with a British bomber squadron, F/L Fred Wright, DFC of Peterborough is serving with the Bison Squadron at Leeming, England. The Bison and the Lion Squadrons, both at Leeming, are the only two Canadian bomber squadrons serving with the Occupational Air Force. Wright came overseas in May 1943 as a pilot. One of his gunners shot down an enemy plane on their trip and Wright won the DFC for bringing back his plane when it was badly damaged after an attack.”

    One night in March 1945 this officer was the pilot and captain of an aircraft detailed to attack Kassel. Shortly after the bombs had been released the aircraft sustained severe damage. The fuselage, mainplane, tail unit and the mid-upper and rear gun turrets were all affected. The elevators jammed and the aircraft dived out of control. Several thousand feet in height were lost before Flying Officer Wright succeeded in levelling out. With great difficulty he retained control and flew on to reach base where he landed the badly damaged aircraft safely. This officer displayed a high degree of courage and coolness in the face of great danger.
    ===================
    I believe credit for the above should be given to Hugh A. Halliday

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by grounded View Post
    Here's a link to some info you will be interested in:
    http://rcafassociation.ca/awards.php
    ============================
    This is what it says when you go to the link:
    WRIGHT, F/O Frederick Foster (J93453) - Distinguished Flying Cross - No.100 Squadron - Award effective 24 April 1945 as per London Gazette of that date and AFRO 918/45 dated 1 June 1945. Home in Peterborough, Ontario; enlisted in Toronto, 23 June 1942. Trained at No.5 ITS (graduated 5 November 1942), No.10 EFTS (graduated 17 May 1943) and No.2 SFTS (graduated 11 August 1943). Invested with award by King George, 13 July 1945. RCAF photo PL-46399 (ex UK-23868 dated 27 December 1945) is captioned as follows: “Following completion of a tour of operations with a British bomber squadron, F/L Fred Wright, DFC of Peterborough is serving with the Bison Squadron at Leeming, England. The Bison and the Lion Squadrons, both at Leeming, are the only two Canadian bomber squadrons serving with the Occupational Air Force. Wright came overseas in May 1943 as a pilot. One of his gunners shot down an enemy plane on their trip and Wright won the DFC for bringing back his plane when it was badly damaged after an attack.”

    One night in March 1945 this officer was the pilot and captain of an aircraft detailed to attack Kassel. Shortly after the bombs had been released the aircraft sustained severe damage. The fuselage, mainplane, tail unit and the mid-upper and rear gun turrets were all affected. The elevators jammed and the aircraft dived out of control. Several thousand feet in height were lost before Flying Officer Wright succeeded in levelling out. With great difficulty he retained control and flew on to reach base where he landed the badly damaged aircraft safely. This officer displayed a high degree of courage and coolness in the face of great danger.
    ===================
    I believe credit for the above should be given to Hugh A. Halliday

    i did in fact find that info i was just trying to find more about it my grandfather told me about this story of him but i did find in a forum archieve about it being friendly fire so im just trying to find more info into it if possible as f.f wright is my grandfather who was the acting captain in this story i still have all his medals including his dfc and log books of all the ops he did during ww2 and all his training its just recently i started actually doing research into it that i have been finding more about it and i was just interested in knowing who else was in the crew that night it would just be nice to hear more storys about it if there is any websites that i have not found that can show more details into this or anything else related to my grandfather or even if anyone is still alive that knew my grandfather in the 100 squadron

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    163
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    A couple tips, if you haven't already:

    The photo mentioned in my last post [RCAF photo PL-46399 (ex UK-23868 dated 27 December 1945)] will be available through Library and Archives Canada.
    They have a huge backlog of unprocessed "ex UK" material.
    As items are requested, they are processed then put up on their site for all to see.
    I requested an "ex UK" photo and the excellent digital copy I received was well worth the approximately $30 Canadian, bottom line after taxes, shipping, etc.

    Another must do, if you haven't already, is to get copies of your grandfather's military service record from Library and Archives Canada.
    It sometimes takes up to 6 months.

    Also, copies of the 100 Sqdn operations Record Book will give you the names of other members of your grandfather's crew.
    Members on this site may be able to assist you with copies of 100 Sqdn ORB from your grandfather's time-period.

    I did the same thing when researching other airmen.
    I have received email from family of airmen that I was looking for after posting their names on this site.

    Best of luck in your search.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Caerdydd, Cymru
    Posts
    633
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Paul,

    I have just been alerted to your post by one of my fellow researchers - I haven't been visiting this forum very regularly of late for a number of reasons.

    My grandfather, Sgt. Alan Smith, was the Bomb Aimer in your Grandather's crew. I have copies of the ORB mentioned above, as well as a crew photo from their time at 100, and a copy of your Grandfather's DFC recommendation. I also have a report on the "friendly bombs" incident referred to by another poster on this thread. I have sent you an email, but I do not know if it will arrive with you. Feel free to contact me: -

    gregATgreg-harrison DOT co DOT uk

    and I will gladly send you anything I have that may be of interest.

    I have struggled in vain for years to find any trace of your Grandfather, or his family, via the internet. A chance remark to one of my fellow researchers earlier this evening resulted in him directing me at this thread. My Grandfather sadly died in early 2012, but I know he would have been thrilled to know I'd finally made contact. He always spoke very highly indeed of your Grandfather's capabilities as a Skipper and Pilot, and recalling the night where they were struck by bombs from above, said that in the hands of a lesser pilot they'd likely not have made it back to the UK.

    I hope you'll see this and get in touch.

    Very best wishes,

    Greg
    "You can take the boy out of Wales,
    But you can't take Wales out of the boy!!"

    Greg Harrison
    100 Squadron and 100 Squadron Association Historian
    100 Squadron Researcher 1917 - present day
    1 Group Researcher 1940 - 1945

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Mr. Lewis. I have been trying to get a message to you today. I was in the Hock Shop in the Kozlov Centre in Barrie and spotted a grouping of WWII medals including a DFC and quite a bit of supporting items such as a flight log. They are your grandfathers. You may or may not know how they got there but I thought it should be brought to your attention. Hope these can find their way back to family.

    Anthony M. (Tony) Porter, CD
    Captain

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A.Porter View Post
    Mr. Lewis. I have been trying to get a message to you today. I was in the Hock Shop in the Kozlov Centre in Barrie and spotted a grouping of WWII medals including a DFC and quite a bit of supporting items such as a flight log. They are your grandfathers. You may or may not know how they got there but I thought it should be brought to your attention. Hope these can find their way back to family.

    Anthony M. (Tony) Porter, CD
    Captain
    Hi sry i javent been on i just saw all of the replys and yes unfortunatly my parents had to hock the medals as they went through some tough times and he really hated to see them go but he had to or he was at the risk of losing his home at the time i might try and find them one day in hopes of getting them back

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi if u can pls email me at p_lewis1980@hotmail.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •