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Thread: Did Bomber Command raid Banak airfield (Northern Norway) 30 June 1942?

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    Default Did Bomber Command raid Banak airfield (Northern Norway) 30 June 1942?

    Hi guys

    Banak airfield was raided on 30 June 1942, when four Ju88s were destroyed on the ground, with others damaged.

    I'm lead to believe that the raid wasn't carried out by the Russians. So, was it Bomber Command?

    Cheers
    Brian

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    Brian (and any others interested)

    Just some figures to contemplate, or play with:-

    Lossiemouth > Banak (direct) c.1044 nm
    Lossiemouth > Banak (round the top, avoiding land) c.1206 nm
    Banak > Reyjavik c. 1335 nm (not a good diversion!)
    Banak > Thorshavn c. 1034 nm (might be a ‘div’ depending on how much/long the r/way was at that time?)

    Lincolnshire > Berlin (direct) c. 463 nm

    The Range of a Lanc (Wiki (admittedly), and various marques) c. 2200 nm – i.e the “there-and-back” distance c.1100 nm (and that’s in ‘still-air’? – the Met winds would eat up more fuel!). Looks like loosening sphincter muscle stuff!!

    Be interesting to see (forward Lanc Navs – ‘real’ or ‘armchair’) if it could be done – let alone if it was done!!

    Any ideas?

    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 8th December 2016 at 16:09. Reason: QSD
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Further to my above.
    And would the RAF Navs have known which way was up (or down, or sideways?) at that latitude, and at that time (1942)?
    See http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic2-3-183.pdf. Written in Oct 1941 it shows (a) the problems, but (b) that at even that early stage of WW2 trans-polar flights were being investigated. The "Aeries" series of Nav investigation flights - immediately post-WW2 - might throw some light on this?
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Thanks for enlightening me, Peter

    I should have been able to work that out for myself!!

    It would seem that Soviet DB-3F bombers were the culprits!

    Cheers
    Brian

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    Hi Brian

    You can find the answer among the Norwegian researchers.

    http://www.luftwaffe.no/SIG/Losses/fors42.html

    A total of six Ju88s were destroyed/damaged on the ground. It was the Russians. See details page 13.

    http://www.luftwaffe.no/SIG%205.pdf

    Regards

    Finn Buch
    Last edited by Argus; 9th December 2016 at 19:53.

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