Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: MF/DF Stations used in the UK in 1941

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,666
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 19 Times in 18 Posts

    Default MF/DF Stations used in the UK in 1941

    Hi all,

    I would like to ask for help and advices regarding the Middle Frequency Direction Finding stations around the UK use by the RAF in 1941.

    I have a translation of an order for a Cross Country flight in October 1941 (which might be inaccurate). Teh crew (WOP in the particular) was ordered to use "MF/DF stations of group L in Manchester, group D in Hull (Kingston upon Hull?) and at RAF Station Sealand" during the flight and also the station at RAF Abingdon.

    I am interested in following:

    1. is this information correct? Were there MF/DF stations?
    2. is possible to find out more infromation about them (exact locations, equipment, used frequencies)?
    3. are there available any ORBs or logs or any other documents in the TNA?

    As this area is new to me, I will be glad also for any good sources to study (except Wiki and other general websites I have already found by Mr. Google)

    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,663
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts

    Default

    Pavel, Hi,
    Yr 1: Yes, there definitely were MF/DF stations (MF, incidentally, is normally 'medium frequency'). The DF receiver huts were mainly wood - with brass fittings - to reduce errors in received signal bearings. Often had rotating aerials turned by the operator. See http://www.heritage.norfolk.gov.uk/r...ordCount=56881 for details of one combined station.
    Yr 2: Ian The Radar will know the technicalities (or, if he doesn't, he will know who does!) if he is on the circuit.
    Yr 3: No idea.
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,666
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 19 Times in 18 Posts

    Default

    Hi Peter, thank you for your post, I am getting the general idea:)

    Pavel

    BTW: have you got my email with a "met" issue?
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    SW Wiltshire
    Posts
    237
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default

    Hi Pavel,

    Air10/2758 in the National Archives is a July 1941 publication - 'Bomber Command Signals Organisation: Pilots' and Navigators' Handbook. ' The chapter on the M/F D/F organisation gives Section locations as follows ('C' indicates control station):

    Section A
    Stations:
    Inverness(C)
    Sumbrugh
    Kirkwall

    Section B
    Station:
    Renfrew (C)
    Stornaway
    Belfast

    Section C
    Station:
    Manchester (C)
    Carlisle
    Ronaldsway

    Section D
    Station:
    Heston (C)
    Hull
    Newcastle

    Section E
    Station:
    Plympton (C)
    Southampton
    St Buryan

    Section F
    Station:
    Sealand (C)
    Andover
    Leuchars

    Section G
    Station:
    Bircham Newton (C)
    Lympne
    Newcastle

    Section H
    Station:
    Pulham (C)
    Tangmere
    Hull

    Section J
    Station:
    Pulham (C)
    Lympne
    Newcastle

    Section K
    Station:
    Hull (C)
    Heston
    Acklington

    Section L
    Station:
    Bristol (C)
    Manchester
    Exeter

    Section M (Practice Section)
    Station:
    Andover (C)
    Western Boyland
    Manchester

    Section N
    Station:
    Southampton (C)
    Lympne
    Exeter

    Section O
    Station:
    Leuchars (C)
    Wick
    Carlisle

    Section P
    Station:
    Tangmere (C)
    Bircham Newton
    (only 2 Stations listed)

    Each Bomber Group had its own allotted Sections, but crews could work any Station if required. Stations could provide fixes (2 or more Stations), or bearings (single Station). M/F D/F also provided an emergency identification procedure - and a/c returning from operations could transmit an identification message to a Section (when 90 to 60 miles from the coast). The receiving Section would pass the identification to Fighter Command. The a/c used its W/T set - no other equipment required.

    HTH,

    Richard

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,666
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 19 Times in 18 Posts

    Default

    Hi Richard, my BIG thanks for very exhaustive information - exactly what I need!

    Pavel

    P.S. pls can you PM me your full name to acknowledge properly your help in my project - sorry it will be in Czech only:)
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •