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Thread: Weather forecast & reports for Irish Sea area on 23. 10. 1941

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    Default Weather forecast & reports for Irish Sea area on 23. 10. 1941

    Hi all,

    this is the last theme I need to clear up in my present reasearch abou Wellington T2624's fate.

    I would like to ask if anybody has available forecast for the area of Irish Sea for 23. 10. 1941?

    The only info I have at present is that the crew "can elater clouds with base at 3.000 ft and rain at the height of 1.000 ft".

    My experience is that it was quite common to record a brief weather situation at unit/station ORB. So I would like to ask if anybody has an ORB for any unit/station for 23. 10. 1941 around the Irish Sea, let say starting at the Cardigan Bay to the north via Anglesey, Liverpool, Blackpool up to Seascale and also over the Isle of Man.

    My rough idea is that weather reports from any of following RAF stations (if recorded) might be helpful:

    BLACKPOOL
    HAWARDEN
    JURBY
    RONALDSWAY
    SEALAND
    TOWYN
    VALLEY
    WREXHAM

    I have already checked ORB of RAF ABERPORTH and there is no weather report at all.

    Any help much apprecitaed.


    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Dennis Burke
    - Dublin

    Foreign Aircrew and Aircraft Ireland 1939-1945
    www.ww2irishaviation.com

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    Default Weather forecast & reports for Irish Sea area on 23. 10. 1941

    Hello,

    The Irish sea was part of the operations area of the Wekusta 51, a Meteorological unit of the Luftwaffe. The daily reports of this unit can be found in Bundesarchiv (Freiburg) : file RL/516 (1940-1941).

    Hope this helps

    Pierre

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    Hi all,

    Dennis - only monthly - but useful anyway, many thanks for pinting me to this source.

    Pierre - thank you, good idea, will check it out.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Re-hello Pavel,

    In their mission reports, the Wekustas aviators told no only about the meteorological information they caught, but - too - fights with ennemy aircraft.

    Pierre

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    I got the point Pierre, thx.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    Pavel,

    Daily Weather Reports (DWR) can be seen on the Met Office website at https://digital.nmla.metoffice.gov.u...-5698d0bd7e13/. They are presented in monthly segments from 1860, and include selected observations plus at least one map daily. However ..... . Each month takes a while to download (at least for me) and one then has to scroll through the month to find the day of interest.

    A DWR was a daily Met Office publication for those interested in the weather, and was published on D+1, ie that for 6 January would be published on the 7th. Although publication continued through the war(s), for obvious reasons none of the issues were distributed. For WW2 each issue includes two weather charts, one for about 0100 GMT and the other for 0700 GMT, plus 50 observations for UK and Irish met offices, timed for 0100, 0700, 1300 and 1800 GMT. Also included is a very general 24-hour forecast for predetermined areas of the UK and Ireland, starting at 1200 GMT.

    At 0700 GMT on 23 October 1941 a large anticyclone of 1038 mb was located at 60N 05W and drifting south, by 0700 GMT the following day it was centred over central Scotland. Most of the UK was dry with largely small amounts of cloud between 1300 and 1800 GMT on the 23rd, the exception being showers and isolated thunderstorms over East Anglia and Kent.

    Only two of the airfields you've listed were included in the DWR, but this list should help:

    1300 GMT
    Station...............................Wind........ .........Visibility...........Cloud
    .........................................(Directio n/Force)..(Miles).............(Height in feet)
    Point of Ayre (N Isle of Man) E/3...................31....................trace Cu 2000
    Valley.................................E/3...................31+.................4-6/10 CuSc 2500
    Pembroke............................E by N/5............31...................2-3/10 Cu 3500
    Sealand..............................NW/1.................2.5..................4-6/10 CuSc 2000
    Manchester..........................NE by N/3..........12.5.................7-8/10 CuSc 3000

    1800 GMT
    Station...............................Wind........ .........Visibility...........Cloud
    .........................................(Directio n/Force)..(Miles).............(Height in feet)
    Point of Ayre (N Isle of Man)...E by N/3............31.................3/10 Cu 3000
    Valley..................................N/1...................12.5..............1/10 Cu 3000
    Pembroke.............................NE/4.................31.................2-3/10 Cu 3000
    Sealand...............................NE by N/1...........1.25..............1/10 Cu 3000
    Manchester...........................N by E/1.............1.25..............2-3/10 CuSc

    In summary the weather over the area in which you are interested, Pavel, was fine and dry with good to excellent visibility over sea and coasts, and mostly less than half cover of CuSc, base 2500-3000 feet. The poor visibility observed at Manchester and Sealand would have been industrial pollution (smoke) from the manufacturing towns of Lancashire and Yorkshire. This is typical of anticyclonic weather at this tme of the year - but note there was NO rain over the Irish Sea.

    (Wind force: 1 = 1-3 miles per hour, 3 = 8-12 mph, 4 = 13-18 mph, 5 = 19-24 mph)

    Brian
    Last edited by Lyffe; 23rd April 2017 at 13:10.

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    Amazing, my BIG thanks Brian!

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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