Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Another Request for AIR 78 Help Please

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,662
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts

    Default Another Request for AIR 78 Help Please

    Hello All,
    I am very grateful for all the AIR 78 help Iíve had, but I have two more very long-shots:-

    Pat Butler
    Roger Hackwell

    Both were MAOs at Chivenor on 517 Sqn around 1946. Iím not certain if the Forenames are complete (and ĎPatí is probably a diminutive from Patrick?). If there are lots of Ďem on AIR 78 then donít bother, but if there are only one or two of each then I would appreciate the details (I will be able, almost certainly, to isolate the correct body by the Service Number!).
    Thanks in advance for any help.
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northumberland, UK
    Posts
    3,918
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 73 Times in 70 Posts

    Default

    Peter

    Hackwell - Air 78/67 has one possible - 1640475 Roger Charles Couch Hackwell. Ancestry has a d.o.b. of August 8th 1923, and died October 7th 2007.

    Butler - Air 78/26 has about 20 Patrick Butlers with various middle names...I can list them if you want.

    Regards

    Simon

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,517
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Simon/Peter,

    Should it be any help it is probably Patrick G Butler (from 517 ORB)

    Brian

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Northumberland, UK
    Posts
    3,918
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 73 Times in 70 Posts

    Default

    Thanks for that Brian, that's very helpful.

    One possible - 1247421 Patrick Gordon Butler. I can see one possible match on Ancestry - d.o.b. February 5th 1905, died July 15th 1976.

    Regards

    Simon

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,662
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts

    Default

    Simon (Lyffe),
    Many thanks for that. If there ever was a list of MAOs in Met Office/Air Min it got destroyed. There weren't many of them - low hundreds? I've managed to reconstruct 82 of them so far from books, articles, photo captions, and - good folk like you!!!
    Rgds
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,517
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Peter,

    The initial strength of the MAO Section was 10 officers and 50 NCOs (1943), this had increased to 28 and 137 respectively by May 1945 (page 49 of Rackliff and Kington's Even the birds were walking). 24 were lost on operations, including 6 who were lost between 8 May 1945 and 18 April 1947.

    Brian

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire, UK
    Posts
    3,662
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts

    Default

    Brian,
    Tks that. My current list, though, will contain all the wearers of the "M" brevet - which takes me up to the disbandment of 202 Sqn (in its Met Recce incarnation) 31 Jul 64.
    Peter
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wiltshire
    Posts
    2,517
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts

    Default

    Peter,

    In the immediate aftermath of the war, in anticipation that all wartime MAOs would have been demobilised by the end of 1947, a scheme was developed whereby the airborne met observing role would be undertaken by surplus pilots and navigators. It was calculated there would be a requirement for 45 men, of whom seven would be officers. In fact things did not quite work out as planned, there being insufficient volunteers, and the gaps were filled by surplus gunners, so that by November 1949 just 10 pilots and 13 gunners were employed in the role.

    During 1950 Met Office staff, in the form of National Servicemen, were reintroduced to the role. The following year, 1951, full-time Met Office staff were allowed to apply for flying duties. At this time the requirement had been reduced to 16 observers, but by the end of the year this had been reduced to 12. A tour of duty lasted two-and-a half years and successful applicants could display the flying 'M' brevet. This reduced establishment continued until the end of met reconnaissance flights in 1964.

    The above is a summary from Jefford's Observers and Navigators, pages 203 and 204.

    Brian

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •