Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: attack configuration

  1. #1
    MAX Guest

    Default attack configuration

    Hello all,
    I would like to know if there are names or nicknames for the following attack configurations for anti-ships operations composed of 12 RAF fighters-bombers during WW2 :

    1st config :

    X X X X X X
    X X X X X X

    2nd config :

    X X X X X X

    X X X X X X

    Thanks a lot for your help !
    BR,
    Max

  2. #2
    MAX Guest

    Default

    PS : due to problem with blanks in the text, the configurations I am seeking for are like this :

    1st config (2 groups of 6 aircrafts as follows, just one group shown) :

    X X X
    X X X

    2nd config (2 lines of 6 aircrafts as follows) :

    X X X X X X

    X X X X X X

    Thanks again for your help !
    BR,
    Max

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,031
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts

    Default

    As nobody else has had a stab at this one, I will give it a go! What about simply calling them flying in Sections, or perhaps Flights, such as Sections of three in line abreast, or two sections in line abreast, or 4 Sections in box formation? So far as I can tell, Bomber Command (or at least in daylight) used to fly in Sections of three (as did Fighters until 1941 or early 1942), and you can just build up formations based on threes, either in lines abreast or in vics, or line astern. Sections can then form larger formations, as in 4 Sections of 3 (12 aircraft) in two lines of six, rear formation lower than lead formation, etc. They may have given such formations fancy names, but if they did I do not know them. However such terms as "Line astern", "Echelon Port (or starboard)" and "Stepped down" seem to have been commonly used, and if the smallest element (the Section) was increased from 3 to 4 aircraft you can get "Boxes" which also be built up into quite impressive formations, like block-building. I am not very certain of Coastal Command Strike formations, but they must have favoured (by experience if nothing else) certain formations for different types of strikes. Just my 10 cents worth.
    David D

  4. #4
    MAX Guest

    Default

    Hello David,
    Many thanks for your help, thjt is interesting. Indeed I did not know if there were such a nickname for these configurations.
    BR,
    MAX from France

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •