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Thread: meaning of met forecast

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    Default meaning of met forecast

    Hi,

    I have found a sentence in an ORB concerning the met forecast. I do not really understand what is meant by the sentence. Maybe one of you could explain it to me. The text is:

    The Met forecast was not favourable as a front was expected on the route of 60 miles depth.

    I wonder what is meant by "front of 60 miles depth". A bad weather front, ok, but the 60 miles depth is relating to what?
    Sorry for that question. It certainly is a problem for me not being a native speaker of English.

    Thanks.

    Marcel

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    Marcel,
    Brian (c/s Lyffe on this forum) will probably be along shortly to answer your question. You should realise, though, that meteorologists spend most of their lives trying not to be definite about fronts (Lol!!)
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    I think I know what it means, Marcel, but before I go off at half-cock (as is not unknown) could you give me the date, squadron or station and the planned operation, please? The information would allow me to access the relevant chart and put my explanation in context.

    Brian

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    Hi Brian and Peter,

    thanks for your answer. The sentence is part of the ORB of 9. Squadron stationed at Honington concerning the raid against Saarbruecken on 29./30.7.1942. The a/c took of around midnight.

    Hope that helps.

    Marcel

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    I suspect, Marcel, that the author of that entry was over-simplifying what was actually said at the briefing. Although there are understandable differences in position, both the British and German charts show a cold front moving south across Belgium/Luxembourg at about 0300 BST, and approaching Saarbruecken . It had been a weak affair as it crossed East Anglia and Kent, where it was accompanied by a narrow belt of patchy drizzle and low cloud. Conditions improved rapidly as the front moved south, and by mid-evening there was hardly any cloud over these areas.

    I think that the forecast probably indicated the front was accompanied by a band of cloud about 60 miles wide, sufficient to restrict visual identification of the target, but not particularly extensive in terms of vertical depth.

    Brian

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    Hi Brian,

    thanks for the details and explanation. I am wondering where you have these details from ...

    Best

    Marcel

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    Marcel

    For many years the Met Office published Daily Weather reports which consisted of a selection of observations and maps; the series started in 1860 and are available on-line at https://digital.nmla.metoffice.gov.u...-5698d0bd7e13/ . The contents of the publication changes over the years, but by WW2 consisted of a daily analysis extended westwards from about 10E to the west coast of the US valid at about 01 GMT, an analysis for the UK for 07 GMT plus a selection of about 50 observations for the UK and Ireland at 01, 07, 13 and 18 GMT. The files are quite large and take a reasonable amount of time to appear on the screen.

    The German equivalent can be accessed at http://www.lib.noaa.gov/collections/...html#o46399078. but take ages to download and are of low quality in terms of clarity..

    In both instances one needs to understand met codes to interpret the data. I think it is best that I leave it to you to access some examples to see what I mean, but please do not be offended if I say that it needs a expert eye to use these sources, especially the second.

    Brian

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    Brian,

    thanks for your answer. I believe you that one has to know much more than I do to understand the data. I have just been curious where one can find such information.

    Best wishes.

    Marcel

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