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Thread: "Making for Sweden"

  1. #1
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    Default "Making for Sweden"

    I was wondering if anyone has the book "Making for Sweden" by Wegmann and Widefeldt in their collection as I understand it has some information regarding the crew of Halifax W1048, which was lost on 27th / 28th April 1942.

    The current price prevents me from purchasing, hence the request before I ask if my local library can obtain a copy.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  2. #2
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    Pete,

    I have the book (but no scanner). Is there anything in particular you want to know?

    The full title is:

    'Making For Sweden...' Part 1 - The RAF 1939 to 1945.
    Wegmann,Rolph & Bo Widfeldt.
    Walton-on-Thames:Air Research Publications,1997.
    (ISBN 1-871187- 33-8)

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 22nd June 2017 at 08:00.

  3. #3
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    Col.

    Thanks for the response.

    I understand from other sources that pages 33-35 cover the crew of Halifax W1048 and I was wondering if it provides any information on their evasion route and timescales. I am making the assumption that all crew members stayed together, but that may be a false assumption.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  4. #4
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    Pete,

    Here is what the book has to say about the crew's evasion (pp.33-4):

    Flying at low level on three engines and on fire was a 'dicey' proposition. Eventually the Halifax was put down on the ice of lake Hoklingen. The crew made a swift exit from the burning bomber and the rear gunner, Sergeant Stephens, broke his ankle in the process. The ice was cracking, however, and Pilot Officer Hewitt had an inadvertent dip in the cold water after jumping from the aircraft. During their exit from the bomber the crew came under small arms fire, and Sergeant Stephens had to be left on the beach. he was later taken prisoner by the Germans. The others divided into two parties before leaving the area.

    The first of the two groups to reach Sweden comprised Pilot Officer MacIntyre, Pilot Officer Hewitt and Sergeant Perry, arriving on 1st May. The second group, formed by Sergeant Wilson and Sergeant Blanchet, reached Skalstugan on 3rd May. The two parties had been helped to the Swedish border by independent groups of friendly Norwegians. Both groups were taken to Undersaker for interrogation...

    Following the interrogation, the men were taken to Falun by train for internment in Framby. Pilot Officer MacIntyre and Pilot Officer Hewitt were repatriated on 1st June 1942 in exchange for a German crew that landed in Sweden on 29th May 1942. Sergeant Perry left Sweden on 30th March 1943, followed by Sergeant Wilson and Sergeant Blanchet on the 5th May.

    Incidentally, the book incorrectly identifies P/O Donald Philip MacIntyre as RAF, he was, in fact, J5998 P/O (Pilot) D. P. MacIntyre RCAF (later DFC, AFC, DFC(US). MiD).

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 23rd June 2017 at 06:41.

  5. #5
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    Thanks Col.

    Your time and effort is much appreciated

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  6. #6
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    Hi Pete

    I have following details about this aircraft and crew in my archive:

    'D.F.M. London Gazette 25.5.1943. 633143 Sergeant Ronald Horace David Wilson, No. 35 Squadron, jointly listed with Can/R. 56057 Sergeant Joseph Pierre Gaston Blanchet, No. 35 Squadron.'

    'The joint Recommendation, for Sergeant Perry (Bar to D.F.M.), Sergeant Blanchet, and Sergeant Wilson, dated 10.5.1942, states 'Pilot Officer MacIntyre and the above mentioned N.C.O.'s were detailed as a crew to attack the German battleship "Tirpitz" in the Aas fjord at Trondheim on the night of 27th April 1942. This flight involved a total flying time of nine hours and covered a distance of 1,350 miles over the North Sea and the mountainous country of Northern Norway. The attack was ordered to be carried out at 150 feet in the face of intense opposition from the battleship and the guns on both sides of the fjord. It would appear that whilst carrying out this courageous attack, Pilot Officer MacIntyre's aircraft must have been fatally damaged by flak, necessitating a forced landing in this most difficult country. By a feat of most superb airmanship, this landing was carried out successfully. Having carried out this forced landing, Pilot Officer MacIntyre and the above N.C.O.'s then made their escape from the numerous search parties that had been sent out by the German garrison in Trondheim. For eight days the members of the crew suffered the greatest hardships, walked through deep snow and crossed the mountains, and in an exhausted condition arrived at the Norwegian border, having covered a total distance of 45 miles. By sheer determination and will-power, they crossed safely into Sweden. For this outstanding example of good airmanship on the part of the captain, initiative and devotion to duty on the part of the whole crew, Pilot Officers MacIntyre and Hewitt are strongly recommended for the immediate award of the D.F.C., and Sergeants Blanchet, Perry, and Wilson, the Distinguished Flying Medal.'

    'Flying Officer MacIntyre's and Pilot Officer Hewitt's joint Recommendation for the D.F.C. adds more detail and states 'One night in April 1942 Flying Officer MacIntyre and Pilot Officer Hewitt were captain and navigator respectively of an aircraft detailed to carry out a low level attack on the German naval base at Trondheim. The target was located and, in face of intense of opposition from the enemy's ground defences, the attack was pressed home with great coolness and determination from a low level. During this operation the aircraft was hit. The outer portion of the wing caught fire and the fuselage and cockpit were filled with smoke. Soon the aircraft was well alight and as it became uncontrollable Flying Officer MacIntyre decided to descend onto a lake to which he was directed by Pilot Officer Hewitt. This he achieved by a feat of superb airmanship. The crew then manned their dinghy and made their way to the side of the lake. After a perilous journey and suffering great hardships, Flying Officer MacIntyre and his crew eventually reached England. The greatest credit is due to both these officers for their calm efficiency and courageous devotion to duty.'

    Regards

    Finn Buch

  7. #7
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    Pete,

    For further bio details on Blanchet & MacIntyre (and others), go to:

    http://rcafassociation.ca/heritage/search-awards/ - For Blanchet, enter R56057 in Search Keyword box, click on Service Number, hit Search. For MacIntyre, enter J5998 in Keyword Box, click on Service Number, hit Search.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 23rd June 2017 at 04:29.

  8. #8
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    Thanks to all for your learned responses and pointers.

    Much appreciated as always

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

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