Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: 266 Sqdn P.O Richard Keith Thompson & 144 Sqdn Sgt Roy Furnivall Thompson

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Hull, East Yorkshire
    Posts
    69
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default 266 Sqdn P.O Richard Keith Thompson & 144 Sqdn Sgt Roy Furnivall Thompson

    I'm assisting in the research of the names on a WW2 Memorial in Elloughton in East Yorkshire. 160052 P.O Richard Keith Thompson & 778361 Sgt Roy Furnivall Thompson were brothers who both lost their lives. I've got some information but hope someone will be able to help.

    PO Richard Keith Thompson was a pilot in 266 Sqn. His Typhoon 1B 'JP399' shot down Brest area on 3rd August 1943. Aircraft was engaged on bomber escort to Brest when downed by a FW 190 near Guipavas. He was buried at Gouesnou. I've discovered a reference to a thread on the forum that has now been archived here: http://www.rafcommands.com/archive/09489.php It mentions a photo of PO Thompson standing next to his Typhoon. Does anyone know the poster (Alan) as I'd really like to get a copy of the photo if possible. Also if anyone has a a copy of the ORB for 266 Squadron I would be really grateful if they could look up PO Thompson's operations.

    Sgt Roy Furnivall Thompson was a pilot in 144 Squadron. His Hampden I 'AD824' was on a Gardening Operation off the Frisian Islands on 07/02/1942 when he was shot down with the loss of all crew. I have the information from Chorley's. I've also downloaded the ORB for January and February and can't find any reference the Sgt Thompson. The aircraft isn't listed in the details for the op on 7th Feb. If anyone can help with Sgt Thompson's ops with 144 Sqdn I'd be grateful

    Thanks in advance for any help

    Dave

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    43
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi Dave
    Sgt RF Thompson joined 144 Sqdn from 83 Sqdn on the 12 January 1942.

    He is probably the Sgt Thompson that flew to Brest on 25 January in P4347,
    Brest on the 27 January and again on the 31 January in AE392.
    He unfortunately recorded no debriefs on these operations before his death on the 7 February.

    Daylight mining operations were carried out on the 6 and 7 February off the Frisian Islands as part of operation ‘Fuller’. On the sixth, 34 Hampdens and 15 Manchester’s successfully laid 70 mines. 144 Squadron played their part on the seventh.

    The following is from my own family research. My father was a pilot with 144 Sqdn at this time. He was nearing the end of his tour, he had been involved in the end of January ops but crashed on take off on the 31 January and was rested until the Channel Dash 12 Feb. You will need a map of the Frisian Islands to be able to follow the events.

    7 February Mining
    Nine 144 Squadron Hampdens, were part of a combined force of 32 Hampdens prepared by 5 Group.

    AE310 P5331 AE142 P1151 AE235 AE141(AD801)* AD832 AE392 AD824
    * P/O Farrington has two aircraft listed against his name AE141 and AD801.
    Departing between 11.15 and 11.45am.

    Taking off in misty conditions all flew in a loose formation crossing the English coast north of Norwich near Cromer. Cloud base was at 2,000 feet over the North Sea.The debriefs would suggest that the majority, but not all 144 Squadron Hampdens, were mining in sea area ‘Yams’, between Wangerooge Island and Heligoland. All approached The Frisians on a parallel course to the coast some 30 miles off shore, turning position 54deg N. 06deg E. a guide based on debriefs and previous similar ops. They then chose individual courses to the intended mining area, encountering low cloud on reaching the Frisians. As a daylight operation it was the norm to carry a fifth crewman, Hampdens flown by P/O Farrington, P/O Frow and Sgt Huband went only with the regular four man crew, suggesting a shortage of air gunners.

    Hampdens from other squadrons had mining co ordinates from sea area ‘Mussels’ west of Terschelling, and along the three ‘Nectarine’ areas stretching the length of the Frisians.

    What would become problematic for some was a large convoy to the north of Spiekeroog, protected by Me109s out of Leeuwarden. The fortunes of different aircraft vary dramatically. 144 Squadron has on record five debriefs in the squadrons ORB from the seven aircraft that returned. S/Ldr Bennett filed his report as a Combat report, and P/O Adams in AD832 filed a combat report as well as an ORB entry but failed in both to give his take off and landing times. The second missing report from a returning Hampden is for AE235 flown by Sgt Taylor. An
    un recorded problem caused him to return early without dropping his mine.

    AE142 had a mild flak reception off the island of Juist. Using the island to pinpoint their position they were able to successful drop their mine in the shipping lane on the co ordinates given. Returning on a reciprocal course, they recorded no sightings of enemy aircraft or ships.

    AD801 on a more northerly course had its turning point position ‘A’ north of Wangerooge turning south for its mining coordinates, returning without incident.

    AD832 flown by P/O Adams reported dropping his mine and seeing a Hampden under attack, one can assume in an area north of Langeoog. Sgt Chadwick my fathers regular rear gunner who had been absent through January returned as wireless operator/air gunner for P/O Adams. It was also a return to operations for P/O Adams, since joining the squadron in November from 61 Squadron he had not taken part on operations.

    P1151 pinpointed on Baltrum Island, they recorded in their debrief avoiding a fighter attack 6 miles north of Baltrum. They had become aware of a fighter formating on them at 1,000 feet.Taking avoiding
    action they entered cloud, the fighter was not seen again.They turned, flying east towards Spiekeroog Island, sighting the convoy north of Spiegeroog and sent a sighting signal back. A signal that should have given others in the squadron prior warning of the convoy and its fighter cover. On the eastern tip of Spiekeroog P1151 pinpointed again, taking a final bearing for their mining position north of Wangerooge, returning without incident.

    P/O Brian Frow who had only recently joined the squadron in December, was flying P5331. He has the earliest recorded take off time. On reaching the Frisians they sighted the convoy and came under immediate attack from two Me109s from astern. Pulling the Hampdens nose up and on a slow starboard turn, the first Me109 attack caused damage to the tail plane, with pieces flying off. His upper rear gunner Sgt Mitchel, returned fire seeing hits on the Me109s fuselage.The second Me109 following, attacked causing damage along the starboard wing and engine as P5331 made its escape entering low cloud, successfully breaking off the engagement. With a damaged port aileron, leaking fuel and oil, thinking they would not make it back, an SOS requesting a positional fix was sent. Receiving the information, the navigator F/O Logan plotted a course home, the damaged aileron made the Hampden difficult to control but with no further incidents P5331 was nursed back to North Luffenham, touching down at 17.20 hours.Their debrief does not mention planting the mine, nor if it was jettisoned safe.The record does include that they returned without it.A round trip of just over six hours, not far off the norm for an operation to Wangerooge. Although badly damaged the aircraft was repaired but lost in a training accident with 5 OTU in 1943.

    For S/Ldr Bennett in AE310 it was also a return to operations, his first since October. Picking a scratch crew, his experienced navigator Sgt Sparks he had borrowed from Ivo Nightingales regular crew, Wix and Price had not been involved in operations for some time and Cassam had arrived from 14 OTU in the middle of December and was on his first operation. On breaking cloud south west of Heligoland AE310 came under light Flak from two large vessels which damage the starboard engine.This reference to shipping would indicate a second convoy in addition to the Convoy reported by P1151 seen off the island of Spiegeroog. With their starboard engine damaged they then came under attack from two ME109s one of which paid them no attention, the second flown by a pilot described in their report as one who knew what he was about, was able to get in a successful burst of
    fire, even though S/Ldr Bennett was using all his experience in an attempt to avoid being hit.The burst of fire created more damage to the starboard wing and control surfaces.The lower rear gunner was able to maintain return fire until his starboard magazine was struck by in coming fire. Cloud cover was gained and the ME109 broke off the attack. With leaking fuel, damage also to the dinghy stowage compartment in the wing, they abandoned any attempt to continue. Facing handling problems, they struggled back taking four hours, jettisoning their mine safe, before landing safely at North Luffenham.

    S/Ldr Bennett recorded his fighter intercept at 14.03 hours. Hampdens AE392 and AD824 will have descended through cloud to a similar reception. English time and German time varied with an hours difference. Ofw. Detlev Lüth 4/JG1, flying a Me109 recorded the times of his attacks on two Hampdens as 15.02 and 15.09 hours. It is assumed these two attacks were against AE392 and AD824 close to their mining coordinates off Langeoog island. No debris was reported as being seen on the surface of the sea, therefore the exact loss position of these two Hampdens is not known.The body of Sgt Ronald Norman Thompson from AD824 was recovered from the sea and brought ashore on Terschelling, where he was buried in Longmore Cemetery, West Terschelling on the 30 April 1942.The body of his pilot and name sake Sgt Roy Thompson was recovered and buried on Ameland. There is no reference in the 144 Squadrons ORB that the mining operation extended into this area of the West Frisians.The body of Sgt Alfred Gibson the rear lower gunner aboard AE392 was recovered and initially buried on Wangerooge suggesting AE392 was attacked and crashed in the mining area south west of Heligoland.With only a seven minute gap between attacks, AD824 may have struggled on after being attacked, turning north and west for home before ditching.

    Lüth may well have followed AD824 to confirm his kill, or simply continued his patrol west along the Frisians. At 16.04 hours he claimed a third Hampden AE306 from 50 Squadron Skellingthorpe, on a mining operation off the island of Terschelling. Lüth may also have been the skillful pilot S/Ldr Bennett encountered. He continued adding successful claims to his tally until he himself became a victim, shot down attacking a bomber stream over central Germany 6 March 1944.

    Hampden AD824 FTR
    Sgt R.F. Thompson KIA
    Sgt R.N. Thompson KIA
    Sgt C.C. Duce KIA
    Sgt L.P.Bow KIA
    Sgt R. Rowell KIA

    Hampden AE392 FTR
    F/Lt W.J.W. Kingston KIA
    Sgt R.C. De Courcy KIA
    Sgt J.A. Tobin KIA
    Sgt A. Gibson KIA
    Sgt A. Fulton KIA

    Hope this helps, John

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Hull, East Yorkshire
    Posts
    69
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Hi John

    That's really great. Thank you so much.

    Dave

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •