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Thread: Use of BRAVO time on D-Day

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    Default Use of BRAVO time on D-Day

    Hi All,

    I'm doing a load of research mainly in relation to 8th Battalion Parachute Regiment, and recently came across a conundrum whilst delving into 233 Squadron's ORB for the operation (they carried the 8th Btn) whereby their Take Off times are recorded as hours BRAVO (23:05B etc). Am I correct in assuming that this was done to synchronise the operational timings with local Normandy time for June? - or was there some other operational driving force?

    Cheers,

    Eric

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    Eric

    See http://www.rafcommands.com/archive/09188.php.

    In most instances times in ORBs are local time, although it is rarely specifically, however:

    'A' = GMT+1, 'B' = GMT+2, N=GMT-1

    Thus to answer your basic question, times were not changed specifically for D-day.

    Brian
    Last edited by Lyffe; 15th August 2017 at 08:23.

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    Eric, Hi,

    Brian has given the reality, BUT

    Welcome to the forum.
    You have walked right into a mine-field!
    I worked in/with the RAF, and the other 2 Services, for more than 42 years.
    Anything, following, in square brackets is meant to be humorous, and not cause offence – but was based on some of my own practical experiences.
    THE ARMY like working in Local Time wherever they are [Anything else causes emotional difficulties. Try the 24-hr clock on an English Cavalry Regt in the 1970’s!]
    THE RAF like working in GMT [It used to be known as ‘Zulu Time’ but is now probably banned under some Racial Equality legislation].
    THE NAVY (when they turn up) say – sorry, ‘pipe’ – “6 Bells in the Mizzen Mast” [or some other outlandish/incomprehensible phrase, and expect all and sundry to understand].
    Very difficult when you come to Orders (either afloat, or on land), or writing Op Orders/Signals involving more than 1 Service. If you stick to GMT then you are likely to get the Army to turn up x-hrs early/late, or the Navy to claim they didn’t understand!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    All of the above is based on real happenings (only very slightly embellished!).

    HTH

    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 14th August 2017 at 18:23. Reason: QSD
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lyffe View Post
    Eric

    See http://www.rafcommands.com/archive/09188.php.

    In most instances times in ORBs are local time, although it is rarely specifically noted

    'A' = GMT+1, 'B' = GMT+2, N=GMT-1

    Thus to answer your basic question, times were not changed specifically for D-day.

    Brian
    Thanks Brian,

    The link you provided gave me the clue "Double British Summer Time" - I had never heard of it but subsequently found a good explanation at https://www.timeanddate.com/time/cha...ndon?year=1944 2nd April till 17th September 1944

    Still not too old to learn!!!

    Cheers,

    Eric

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    Hi Peter,

    Thanks for the welcome!

    I was in the Navy and never understood the piping business, but then I never understood the way they coded and identified the compartments in a ship either!

    Cheers,

    Eric

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