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Thread: loss / ditching off Gravelines (F), in the north Sea

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    Default loss / ditching off Gravelines (F), in the north Sea

    Hello

    I've been given a piece of archive from the "Police de l'Air" in the Pas-de-Calais area. It mentions a fisherman trawler uncovering, on 26 February 1959, about 15 miles north of Gravelines, of the wreckage of a plane. It was found to be the fuselage of a twin-engine aircraft, and port wing, with a radial engine and fixed-pitch propeller. They also found a machine gun and ammo.

    The Policemen tried to identify it, and found two plaques :
    TROJER LTD - Croydon - DRG n░ LAC 983
    ARIER BOMBES TYPE E - SÚrie n░ B 507 - 1938 EDRGADI (retyped as typed in 1959, carrier bomb obviously)

    In the fuselage bits of parachutes were found, one with the following markings :
    IRVIN AIRCHUTE LTD - LEICHWORTH HEATH - MFG n░ 13599 - 1-3-38 - AID 5 FO - 2-3-38 SAC 94 24-2-38 (Leitchworth in Hertfordshire)

    I don't know what happened to that wreck, which was surely scrapped soon after. Machine gun and ammo were recovered by the gendarmerie.

    I'm considering either an Avro Anson or Airspeed Oxford.

    Thanks in advance for any help about this long shot.

    Joss
    Last edited by jossleclercq; 15th August 2017 at 10:34.

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    Default

    Joss,
    Anson would certainly fill the bill, as I cannot think of why any other type of British (nationality seems to be beyond dispute) twin-radial engined aircraft operating off the coast of France with fixed-pitch props subsequent to 1938. It is a wonder that attempts were not made to correspond with British authorities at the time to try and positively identify at least the type of aircraft, as it sounds as though enough of wreckage did survive to identify engines, props, and almost certainly the type of airframe. Serial numbers of weapons, and more particularly aero engines of all Ansons (if this was indeed the case) lost in the general vicinity might well have provided a definitive answer.
    David D

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    Hello

    There's a possibility that the "Police de l'Air" made contact with the British MoD or the R.A.F. at the time in order to identify, but I don't have any means to know what may have been down in 1959. Another paper I was given was about another discovery by a fisherman of an aviation engine in his trawling net. No clue at all on this other discovery.

    I too incline to think of an Anson, especially as some were used for anti-submarine patrols over the Channel and North Sea very early during the war.

    Thanks for your help

    Joss

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