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Thread: Air/Sea Rescue Service RAF

  1. #1
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    Default Air/Sea Rescue Service RAF

    I discovered that the RAF had moored rescue floats for downed crew.

    Is there a list existing about the mooring coordinates ?

    I read many books about the Fighter & Bomber Command but the "floats" were never mentioned ????

    Here a picture of such a float : https://i45.servimg.com/u/f45/17/35/13/62/asr1010.jpg
    Last edited by horsapilot; 25th August 2017 at 09:05.

  2. #2
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    I did some research on these a few years ago and I found (or was provided with) this information regarding locations:

    Craft Location In Place Remarks
    ASR-1 Sheerness 01/07/1941
    ASR-2 Sheerness 01/07/1941 Reported lost 22/10/41
    ASR-3 Great Yarmouth By 05/08/1941 Dry docked, withdrawn for repairs
    ASR-4 Harwich Early July 1941
    ASR-5 Grimsby 01/07/1941 Temporary withdrawn
    ASR-6 Great Yarmouth 01/07/1941 Reported lost 27/11/41
    ASR-7 Grimsby 01/07/1941
    ASR-8 Sheerness 01/07/1941
    ASR-9 Dover Early July 1941
    ASR-10 Dover Early July 1941
    ASR-11 Dover Early July 1941 Reported lost 30/11/41
    ASR-12 Dover Early July 1941 Reported lost but not confirmed
    ASR-13 Great Yarmouth By 05/08/1941
    ASR-14 Grimsby By 05/08/1941 Dry docked, waiting re-mooring
    ASR-15 Norwich By 05/08/1941
    ASR-16 Sheerness By 05/08/1941
    ASR-17 Dover By 05/08/1941 Ex-German
    ASR-22 Newhaven By 05/08/1941 Ex-German
    ASR-23 Newhaven By 05/08/1941 Ex-German
    ASR-NI Portsmouth By 05/08/1941 Ex-German
    ASR-E5 Portsmouth By 05/08/1941 Ex-German

    I hope this is a useful start point

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  3. #3
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    Thank you Pete.
    Just wondering up to when the rescue floats were used as I never read this in WW2 RAF books?
    Were the crew advised of the locations 'in case of' ?
    Do I understand that some floats were taken from the Germans ??
    Interesting subject...

  4. #4
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    This is an extract from AIR Publication 3232 (Air / Sea Rescue)

    Rescue Floats and Buoys.

    Although the German Air/Sea Rescue floats had created a good deal of interest, there was no proof that they had been successful. However, in January 1941, Air Ministry agreed to build sixteen floats of a similar pattern as an experiment, to be moored in various channels and estuaries.' These floats painted red and orange were equipped with food, clothing, a cooking stove and blankets and were provided with an automatic W/T set, distress signals, signalling torch, and whistle to attract the attention of passing shipping.

    Naval and Royal Air Force craft visited the floats from time to time to service them and to take off any airmen who might have managed to reach them.

    Although the knowledge of the presence of these floats undoubtedly exerted a good influence on the morale of aircrews, no rescues were ever effected by them. The initial experiment was not repeated, but those floats already in position were allowed to remain.

    During April five ex-German life saving floats which had drifted ashore on the British coast were placed in position for the use of our distressed airmen, at Portsmouth, Shoreham and Newhaven.'

    Provision of smaller buoys with fixed moorings seemed a much more practicable proposition. This was discussed at D.C.A.S.'s meeting on 14 January, when it was suggested that suitable navigational buoys should be fitted with ladders and ropes to enable a ditched airman to clamber on to them. On 27 February the Admiralty were asked to fit suitable buoys on the east and south coasts as temporary refuges, with ladders, life lines and a box containing rations, water, first-aid kit, knife, floating lamp. Verey pistol and cartridges. In addition a yellow flag was provided, so that anyone who managed to climb aboard could let searching aircraft know of their presence on the buoy. In June, the scheme was extended to cover the Milford Haven. Cardiff and Tyne areas.

    Regards

    Pete
    Last edited by PeteT; 25th August 2017 at 16:55.
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  5. #5
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    Pete,
    I have all requested information thru the 'Rescue Publication'
    This info is shared on a French language RAF & USAF forum.
    Again thank you
    Nice weekend

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