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Thread: Hugh Selmes Jackson DFC Malta Spitfire pilot.

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    Default Hugh Selmes Jackson DFC Malta Spitfire pilot.

    I've been asked to see if I can find out more about Hugh Selmes Jackson, he won the DFC on Spitfires in Malta in 1942/3, but was shot down and captured before the award was made.

    I've asked for more information such as service number and rank from the relatives and am awaiting a reply, I'll post any more details when I get them.

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    TA, Hi,
    1166483 [Cardington, poss end-May 40] LAC Hugh Selmes JACKSON Cmd Plt Off(p), RAFVR, (63098) 23rd Mar. 1941.
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Last edited by Resmoroh; 6th December 2017 at 06:27. Reason: QSD
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Hello,

    63098 A/S/L Hugh Selmes JACKSON DFC RAFVR - DFC - LG: 23/7/1943 p.3325 - 125 Sqn*.

    https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/...upplement/3325

    * The LG is in error quoting 125 Sqn., it should read 126 Sqn.

    Col.
    Last edited by COL BRUGGY; 6th December 2017 at 06:46.

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    Thanks chaps, for the lightening quick response. That gives me a great starting point to fill in the gaps before Malta.

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    As often seems to happen, the Malta connection may now not be so strong.

    I've checked the various Malta Air War sources on line (and a few books) and can find no trace of him on Malta (from 126 pilot listings) or being flown/flying in during the siege via carrier etc.

    It seems he probably arrived at the time 126 Sqn moves on to Sicily. Despite fairly rapid promotion to A/S/L at the age of 21 and a DFC for completing 100 ops, he is remarkably 'under the radar! I'm hoping for a little more family information too.

    Does anyone have any suggestions as to where I might investigate next?



    Hugh Selmes Jackson DFC *1921 - 2009‬
    He was born on December 14th, 1921. He died at the age of 88 on December 26th, 2009.



    This is a photo from a family tree site, I'm just off to look into it!

    Edit, from local Kent publication.....
    Supermarine Spitfire Mk Vb, serial number EN830, was built by Vickers Armstrong at their Castle
    Bromwich factory, and duly named Chislehurst and
    Sidcup, which was painted in a 'semi-circle' on the
    camouflaged nose section just forward of the cockpit.
    On completion, the first test flight took place on 30th
    April 1942.
    Tests completed, the machine was delivered to 37 MU
    [Maintenance Unit] RAF Burtonwood, Cheshire, on
    31st May and was stored for subsequent allocation.
    Chislehurst and Sidcup was issued to 131 (County of
    Kent) Squadron on 8th June 1942. Her regular pilot
    was Flying Officer H S Jackson.
    131sqn was at Merston at the time, hence the Tangmere connection!
    Last edited by Tangmere Archivist; 6th December 2017 at 19:05.

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    An interesting email this evening, detailing this officers capture and incarceration in Stalag Luft 111 ( of Great Escape fame).


    Yes, while grandpa was flying out in Malta (I think I mentioned that during this time he flew over 100 sorties and was awarded the DFC), he was shot down I believe over Italy, I think west of Florence. There he was crash landed and escaped the air craft unharmed, notifying his squadron by waving after leaving the wrecked plane. He was then captured by the enemy. I'm not sure where he was taken to start with, but with the help of local partisans who supplied him with a boat, he escaped.


    The only story he ever told us as young grandchildren (as you say, he rarely spoke of the war and his experience), was whilst rowing an enemy boat approached and aimed for him. One bomb landed in front of his boat, the next behind, and it was then he surrendered - imagining the third might strike!
    From there he was passed into German hands where he was taken to Stalag Luft III. I have letters, telegrams and handwritten documents kept during his time there. The letters kept by his mother document the advancement of allied forces up until they were forced to March towards Poland when the Russians drew closer. I know little about that part but can only imagine really what he and his comrades went through. I think in total grandpa was in captivity for around a year or 18 months.

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    TA,

    You don't say, but have you suggested the family applies for his service record? I suspect it might add some reality to a story told in good faith (pre-POW).

    Brian

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