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Thread: Log Book entry Dual Landings

  1. #1
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    Default Log Book entry Dual Landings

    Hi all,

    I would like to ask for confirmation of Log Book entry understanding.

    If a pilot has in his log book an entry with text "Dual landings" and time filled into the column Multi-engine Aircraft - Dual, do I understand correctly that particular aircraft (Wellington) has to be equipped with dual controls?
    Is it possible to find out somewhere which Wellington serials had dual controls?

    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  2. #2
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    Pavel

    I had always assumed (rightly or wrongly) that this just meant they were "under instruction" at the time, not that the aircraft was fitted with dual controls.

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  3. #3
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    Pavel,
    I assume another pilot was carried on this flight, and that "your man" would be under instruction from this person. However "dual landings" would indicate that "your man" would have to demonstrate to the presumed instructor or staff pilot that he could make good landings on a fairly regular basis, but whether dual controls were fitted in the aircraft at the time is a moot point. It is possible, but I would have thought for initial landings on type, dual controls would have been a good idea in case the "pupil" let the landing get out of hand. I imagine that OTUs, etc, would have a few dual control aircraft on strength specifically for such purposes, for new pilots converting to a heavy aircraft for the first time. However once past this stage, a pilot should be fairly confident with his landings and take offs and not require another (experienced) pilot to baby sit him. For most air exercises it would probably be possible for pilots to change places, but for landings and take offs this sort of thing would be out of the question.
    David D

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    Thank you chaps for explanation, very much appreciated.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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