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Thread: What was an Air Pilotage Officer Responsible for?

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    Default What was an Air Pilotage Officer Responsible for?

    What was an Air Pilotage Officer Responsible for on a Squadron during the 1920s/30s?

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    Steve
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

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    Hi Steve

    Air Pilotage was the original name for Navigation so he was the Sqn Nav Officer.

    Malcolm

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    Steve/Malcolm,

    Working from basic principles, Aerial Pilotage is defined as Aerial navigation by visual identification of landmarks (https://www.thefreedictionary.com/pilotage).
    You have a Sqn Officer doing this job. It would seem reasonable for all the Sqns on a Station to be using the same info, therefore the post probably then became S Nav O (Station Nav Officer). As aircraft/navigation became more complex, there was clearly a need – post-WW2 – for some sort of Service-wide organisation to disseminate navigation information/warnings, etc, etc. Thus 1 AIDU at Northolt in 1957 and the invaluable En Route/FLIP docs!!

    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Peter

    At the time Steve is taking about officers with the 'p' annotation (for having completed a course at the School of Air Pilotage) were allocated to squadrons rather than stations. By the time Stations began to assume that type of responsibility the annotation had been changed to 'n' for the basic navigation course or 'sn' for the long navigation course (usually bomber and coastal sqns)

    Malcolm

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    Malcolm,
    Tks yrs. I was a Met NSA at an overseas (desert) Station in the early 50's. S Nav O was the Station Desert Rescue Column Commander. He came into the Met Office looking for a Deputy Navigator for the Column. I was plotting a chart. S Nav O said (looking at me!) "He'll do". My (civilian) Boss said "But he knows nothing about navigation!". S Nav O said "He's got the chart the right way up - that's 50% of the answer! Leave the rest to me!". And so I learned about sun-compasses, "taking a shovel for a walk", and in which language to swear at the 'gharry' when it wouldn't start after a cold night under the stars! Not a lot - as my Met O Annual Report said - to do with meteorology!!!
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Thanks for the quick response gents, and your own story Peter! :-)
    41 (F) Squadron RAF at War and Peace, April 1916-March 1946
    http://brew.clients.ch/41sqnraf.htm

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