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Thread: ennemy shipping damage category

  1. #1
    Micky Guest

    Default ennemy shipping damage category

    Hello all,

    Just would like to know what Cat. II and Cat.III would mean concerning ennemy shipping attacked by RAF fighter. I have red several time that pilots made such claims against ennemy ships but I wonder how we should translate these abbrevations. Would be glad if someone could lead me to a list of such abbrevations, thanks!
    Micky

  2. #2
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    Default categories of damage

    You have posed a good question, and I would be interested in finding the definitive answer.

    After looking back over some old notes, it seems likely that the standard ‘cat’ system was used for shipping as for aircraft:
    Category I: destroyed
    Category II: probable
    Category III: damaged

    Perhaps if anyone has further information they can correct any error in what I have posted.

    Hope this helps,

    Bruce

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    Default

    As an alternative, check out the list of aircraft category/date supplied by the RAF Museum in this link under 'category of damage'. This seems to have 1 as the least damage and 5 as the most, but it depends on date.

    http://www.rafjever.org/glossary.htm

    But perhaps the Navy did it the other way round!.
    Last edited by gbh1f; 13th December 2007 at 17:08.

  4. #4
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    Default categories

    The categories of damage described in the RAF link relate to RAF aircraft damaged in service: these are own aircraft assessed for damage and categorised for costs/manhours, likelihood of return to service etc.

    Reporting how much damage one has inflicted on an enemy aircraft is quite different, and so is the language used. The broader terms of ‘destroyed’, ‘damaged’ and ‘probable’ were sufficient for Intelligence Officers, since they were generally producing data on a daily or even hourly basis. For what it is worth, British WW11 AA Command, which was under Army control, used the same three categories listed in my earlier posting.

    Hope this helps,

    Bruce Dennis

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