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Thread: Abbreviations in Navigators Diary

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    Default Abbreviations in Navigators Diary

    Good evening

    I have been reading the transcript of a Navigator's diary in which he describes the routes to and from the target for his operations. In several he refers to a point or place as OCC H or OCC S or OCC T. These points are the first place after Base on the outbound journey e.g. BASE - OCC H - EGMOND - HAGUE - HANBURG etc.

    Can anyone suggest what OCC H etc stand for.

    Thanks

    Daz

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    Hi Daz,

    Bit of a shot in the dark if you'll excuse the pun, but possibly refers to an "Occulting Light", a light which gives a fixed pattern of light and dark periods.

    The present day ICAO abbreviations (ww1.atmb.net.cn) still gives OCC as Occulting (light).

    regards
    Peter

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    Daz, Hi,
    There is a possible (rpt – possible!!) explanation for “OCC x” in yr Nav’s diary – and another very long shot.
    Egmond, Netherlands and Southwold, Suffolk are two route Turning Points (either outbound, and/or inbound) that appear with some regularity in Bomber Command raid routings. 20nm inland from Southwold is the village of Occold (GE 52.291969 1.161578). Occold to Egmond is 130nm on a bearing of 080T. With a/c often coming from many different bases it was necessary to have some sort of “forming up procedure” before exiting UK over Southwold (the track from Occold to Egmond runs 1nm north of Southwold!).
    Alternatively, all morse letters you quote use either all ‘dits’, or all ‘dahs’ - easier to do on a vertically pointing searchlight?
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Sometimes On Course Correction points - more normal for Obs/Nav in light/medium bomber or pilot nav actions rather than dedicated nav in heavy bomber.

    Landmarks where drift or error could be measured and Closing Angle correction applied to the next leg to bring the aircraft back on track.

    Ross

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    Many thanks to you all for your comments, I think Ross may have hit the nail on the head, I'll go back and check but I'm sure that he also refers to measuring drift in his comments. I'll update later. Thanks again

    Daz

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    So after some more investigating it would appear that Pete's view of a light beacon is the most likely solution. In some of the diary entries the Navigator gives the location of the OCC point and they tally with turning points in the op orders. My guess is that these were units who were deployed to position flashing light beacons used to indicate specific points; on 7th Feb 1943 OCC T was approximately 3 miles NNW of Woodhall Spa, OCC D was near Portland in Dorset. On the 26 Feb 43 OCC S was about half a mile SW of Great Ravely, near Huntingdon, yet 2 nights later the same reference point, OCC S was operating to the South of Worcester, so perhaps the letter being flashed was classified and only released as part of the detailed navigation plan for the mission.

    Daz
    Last edited by 78SqnHistory; 2nd May 2018 at 20:07.

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