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Thread: RAF WW2 99 Squadron operations record book abbreviations

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    Default RAF WW2 99 Squadron operations record book abbreviations

    I'm researching Sgt Stan Holt who was lost returning from a mission on 29/30 April 1941. I have downloaded the squadron's operations record book for April from the national archive but there are a couple of abbreviations I've not been able work out. I've searched every combination online but none of the online glossaries seem to contain them.

    The record for the flight says:

    Aircraft failed to return.N.A.P. was sent at 00.50hrs and the last thing heard of the aircraft was S.O.S. at 03:14hrs. previous to which the aircraft was homing on Waterbeach D/F.

    I'd like to clarify what N.A.P. stands for and D/F

    Any help would be gratefully recieved as I think I've exhausted all options with google searches.

    All the best
    Andy Holt (Stan's nephew)

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    Hi Andy, D/F is direction finding. Given the context I’m almost certain that NAP is number and position, but hopefully someone can confirm

    Richard

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    Andy, Hi,
    D/F is Direction Finding.
    The a/c WoP contacts the Ground Station by H/F W/T. He then holds the a/c morse key down for 5, or 10 seconds – thus giving a continuous tone. The Ground Station then swings a highly directional aerial to get a ‘null’ bearing, and/or a ‘max’ bearing. This will be in degrees True. This is then converted into degrees Magnetic (using whatever the local magnetic declination is/was) to produce a QDM (a magnetic compass bearing for the a/c to steer to reach the ground station) which is passed by H/F W/T back to the a/c.
    At least that was the theory. A lot could go wrong (and often did!!)
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Thankyou Peter, my uncle Stan was actually the wireless operator.

    Quote Originally Posted by Resmoroh View Post
    Andy, Hi,
    D/F is Direction Finding.
    The a/c WoP contacts the Ground Station by H/F W/T. He then holds the a/c morse key down for 5, or 10 seconds – thus giving a continuous tone. The Ground Station then swings a highly directional aerial to get a ‘null’ bearing, and/or a ‘max’ bearing. This will be in degrees True. This is then converted into degrees Magnetic (using whatever the local magnetic declination is/was) to produce a QDM (a magnetic compass bearing for the a/c to steer to reach the ground station) which is passed by H/F W/T back to the a/c.
    At least that was the theory. A lot could go wrong (and often did!!)
    HTH
    Peter Davies

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    Thankyou Richard, that seems to make sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard View Post
    Hi Andy, D/F is direction finding. Given the context I’m almost certain that NAP is number and position, but hopefully someone can confirm

    Richard

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    Hi all,

    I do not agree with Richard.
    NAP meaning is different as far as I know but unfortunately I am not able to say the correct meaning.
    I would guess it has something to to with the bombs release and well known code is NGZ. This code confirmed that the aircraft successfully dropped the bomb load on the target.
    During my research of 311 Sq operations I came across following codes:

    BAR - probably emergency release of bomb load (not sure)
    FTR - ?
    FTV - ?
    NAP - ?
    NGZ - bombs on target
    WJR - ?

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

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    I thought FTR was more usually used when an a/c Failed To Return from its mission?
    HTH
    Peter Davies
    Meteorology is a science; good meteorology is an art!
    We might not know - but we might know who does!

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    Here is a photo of Stan. He's on the left of the image. I don't have names for the other two flight crew.


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    Peter I have forgot to point out those are codes used by Wireless Operators and were recorded in the base log of W/T communication and all of them are from aircraft which landed later:-)

    Pavel
    Last edited by CZ_RAF; 6th June 2018 at 18:30. Reason: typo
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
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