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Thread: "Shaky - do" leave

  1. #1
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    Default "Shaky - do" leave

    I have just been reading about a No. 35 Squadron crew who were given 4 days "shaky-do leave" after their air gunners were seriously injured during an operational sortie.

    I was wondering if it was standard practice to get leave after a particularly stressful operation across all Bomber Command squadrons and, if so, whether the 4 days was a fixed leave period.

    Can anyone shed any light on this subject?

    Regards

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  2. #2
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    Default

    Just off the top of my head, this sounds like a decision made by the senior officers of the squadron (and perhaps the station), with Sqdn CO, station medical officer, and perhaps flight commander being involved, with the medical officer perhaps holding the central role and making his recommendations. No doubt these decisions would be decided on a case by case basis, and there must have been an underlying policy or protocol which may well have had roots in the earliest days of the RAF and RFC/RNAS. Such practices included ordering a pilot involved in a crash (so long as he was not injured) to immediately take up another aircraft so that he would retain his confidence in his own flying ability, probably along similar historical psychological thinking which required that an officer thrown off his own horse should immediately attempt to remount, for what were considered to be numerous good reasons. Just my ten cents worth.
    David D

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    David

    My gut feel was that it was all dependent on the timing, the crew and the circumstances, so I would agree with your assessment of the situation.

    It is the first time that I have heard that particular phrase used in relation to "compassionate" leave, hence the enquiry to see if it was common parlance / practice at the time.

    Regards (and thanks as always for the feedback)

    Pete
    Main areas of research:

    - CA Butler and the loss of Lancaster ME334 (http://rafww2butler.wordpress.com/ )
    - Aircrew Training (Basic / Trade / Operational / Continuation / Conversion)
    - The History of No. 35 Squadron (1916 - 1982) (https://35squadron.wordpress.com/)

    [Always looking for copies of original documents / photographs etc relating to these subjects]

  4. #4
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    Hi Pete, FWIW, the phrase I'm more familiar with after a crew gets shot up is 'survivors leave'. My guess is that it was discretionary.

    Richard

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