Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Language question - sergeant stripes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,515
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 14 Times in 13 Posts

    Default Language question - sergeant stripes

    Hi all,

    I would like to ask what is the correct writing of the term "sergeant stripes"?
    Yes I am aware that there would be different opinions but I would like to consult this with native speakers:-)

    I would say there are following possibilities:
    1. sergeant stripes
    2. Sergeant stripes
    3. Sergeant Stripes

    My favourite is No. 2

    TIA

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Kirkeby
    Posts
    446
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    Hi Pavel

    I have seen the term "Sergeant's chevrons" (plural) many times in "Casualty & Investigation Reports".

    Regards

    Finn Buch
    Last edited by Argus; 13th August 2018 at 22:19.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,031
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts

    Default

    Pavel,
    I would think that sergeant's stripes (note possessive apostrophe) or even chevrons would be fine, although they could even be referred to as a badge of rank, but most cannot bring themselves to call them a badge. During WW2 it became common for NCOs to wear these badges/chevrons/stripes on only one of the upper arms, as a cost saving measure (cannot recall which arm was to carry the badge).
    David D

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    246
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 25 Times in 25 Posts

    Default

    As Argus posted 'Chevron' is the official term for a stripe,but never used by RAF personnel.
    Commonly referred to as 'Stripes' or 'Tapes' by most RAF types.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,515
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 14 Times in 13 Posts

    Default

    Many thanks for all comments.
    So I would stick with "Sergeant's stripes".

    David: it was left arm as far as I remember from photos.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Northamptonshire
    Posts
    1,116
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Default

    And then of course, there's Army spelling of the rank!!!!!!!!!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,031
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 7 Posts

    Default

    Oldduffer,
    I presume that you are referring to the "j" spelling, which was also used by RAF in the early days, and some older chaps insisted it was the only CORRECT spelling till the day they died. I believe that was the original French influence.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Aubers, France
    Posts
    2,382
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts

    Default

    Hello David

    It's Sergent in French, no j, minus the 'a'. Unless there was a very old spelling (vieux franšais), of which I'm not aware.

    Joss

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wheaton, MD, USA (Wash DC area)
    Posts
    358
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default

    Use of initial caps within a sentence is often not needed for general reference. It's "a sergeant", not "a Sergeant", for example. So it is "sergeant's stripes", not "Sergeant's stripes" -- and including the apostrophe, as earlier pointed out by David Duxbury.

    The frequent use of initial caps within a sentence is very common, sometimes even in works that have gone through an editing process (which nowadays may amount to just a cursory edit, at best). In my own book project last year, even though I kept capitalisation to a minimum in the submitted manuscript, my editor at Fonthill Media called for even less initial caps usage. Writing guidelines can vary from publisher to publisher, so some of Fonthill's rules on capitalisation, perhaps, can be challenged. In fact, in the writer's guide sent to me by Fonthill, I caught some unedited false uses of initial caps!

    Here is something Fonthill sent me on the subject of capitalisation -- from that same writer's guide:

    Capitals are often overused or used inconsistently. As a very general rule, never
    capitalise without good cause. Titles of officers in committees, such as secretary,
    treasurer, chairman, president, etc., should not use capitals. The USA has a
    President but the local bowling club has a president. Further incomplete references
    to capitalised proper names do not need capitals, for example: the Savoy Hotel
    – this hotel; Manchester University – his university; Lake Victoria – the lake. The
    following short extract does not need a single capital letter (apart from at its
    beginning): The Town Pump was situated beside the Church Hall; the Vicar was
    often seen out with the Choir in the Hall’s vicinity.


    Now, rank would get the initial caps only if the person's name followed. For example:

    Sergeant Smith was an air gunner on a crew where each man held the rank of sergeant. The mid-upper gunner, Sergeant Popadopoulas, did not like the use of initial caps in Fonthill Media's books, but he liked their books, especially RAF LIBERATORS OVER BURMA by Bill Kirkness DFM and Matt Poole. (Hah! I couldn't restrain myself on that one...)

    I've received some correspondence where the initial caps usage is obviously over the top. Sort of like this:

    I went to the Store to fetch a Soda on a Hot August afternoon, but the Manager, a former Flight Lieutenant in the Royal Air Force, denied me the Opportunity to be Ripped Off when he Slammed the Door shut and Locked it before I could purchase the Overpriced Soda.

    I would edit it to this:

    I went to the store to fetch a soda on a hot August afternoon, but the manager, a former flight lieutenant in the Royal Air Force, denied me the opportunity to be ripped off when he slammed the door shut and locked it before I could purchase the overpriced soda.

    And there will be dissenting opinions on the use of initial caps, I know. This, however, is my Two Cents wOrTh...

    [Pavel, you wrote me the other day...apologies for not responding yet -- I've been deeply involved in another project. I'll answer you soon.]
    Last edited by Matt Poole; 16th August 2018 at 23:35. Reason: I chose a gooder wurd in one case.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Prague, Czech Republic
    Posts
    3,515
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 14 Times in 13 Posts

    Default

    Matt, many thanks for your comprehensive post, I really appreciate it!
    [even if I have also my experience with the Fonthill]

    Looking forward your reply.

    Pavel
    Czechoslovak Airmen in the RAF 1940-1945
    http://cz-raf.webnode.cz

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •